Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘trolling tips’ Category

GETTING YOUR MONEY’S WORTH

GETTING YOUR MONEY’S WORTH

Originally Published the Week of May 22, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

A few days ago, I had a couple of guys come to our Tailhunter Restaurant and Sportfishing offices here in La Paz.  They were pretty troubled to say the least. 

Actually, they were pissed off.

And they needed to vent. 

Insofar as we run a fishing operation and have been down here forever, I was a handy target.

I knew who they were.  They had contacted me several weeks earlier inquiring about a fishing package with hotel, fishing and other things.

Cool. No big deal.  Appreciate the inquiry.  I gave them a regular quote for the package.

They wrote back that they I was “too pricey” (their words) and they’d just make their own reservations and “wing it.”

So, what they did is go through a general 3rd party online booking agency for their hotel for “great hotel discounts…blah blah blah.”

I’m sure you’ve heard commercials like that.

Then, when they arrived here in La Paz, they walked around the marina and found a guy selling fishing trips and set up several days of charters.

Well…the hotel was not as described online.

 It was “not steps to the beach.”  The pool was not filled like the pretty photos.  It was half-empty because the filters “weren’t working.” The rooms had faulty air-conditioning. 

But the hotel staff told them they could “upgrade” if they wanted. They were told  that the online booking agency sold them “economy rooms.”

On top of that, they had given the guy at the docks several hundred down payment in cash. 

They were supposed to get picked up at their hotel in the morning.  No one showed up. 

They called the phone he had given them.  No answer.

They took a taxi to the marina.  No boat.  No guy to be found.

And, they let loose on me as if it was MY fault.  If I had given them a better price, they would have booked with me!

On top of it, after they finished their story, they asked…

“Can you help us get a refund from the hotel and help them find the guy who sold them the charters so they could get their money back?”

When I asked the guy’s name, all they could tell me was his name was “Gonzalo” and he was short and had black hair.  He had a mustache and spoke decent English. He had a New York Yankees baseball hat.

Oh, and he was a “Mexican guy.”

That described about half the population of Mexico.

They promised if I helped them get their money back, they would use that money to book with me in one of the hotels we work with .  They would also do their fishing with our operation!

Please oh please help us!  Wa-wa-wa!

I had to tell them, they were probably outta luck.  They would have to pursue any refunds from the 3rd party online booking company.  The hotel surely wasn’t going to give them refunds.

And good luck finding someone named “Gonzalo” out on the docks.

They unfortunately, walked away mumbling something about “everyone in Mexico is a rip-off artist” and some other choice words about me as well.

I hated to see this happen to anyone because there are indeed some good independents out there, but when you cut corners, you sometimes really DO get what you pay for.

And in Mexico, there often isn’t much recourse.  You’re on a vacation.  You don’t have time or inclination to chase someone around. You’re in country for a limited time so you’re not going to stick around searching for someone to solve your problems.

You’re probably going to just have to eat it and make the best of it.  Call it a learning lesson.

The hotel part of their vacation didn’t sound like a scam, but they surely didn’t get what they expected.  The guy on the docks?  Well, that was possible scam.  Or not. 

You just don’t know and vacation is a terrible time to find out.

Maybe signals were just crossed.  Who knows?

Whether these guys were victimized or not, the biggest problem is there’s no recourse or accountability.  There’s no one to go after. 

I’m surely not the one to bitch at, fellas .

And therein lies the issue when you “wing it.”

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________
 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004. Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico http://www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront. If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi. It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!


Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website:

http://www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address: Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA 91942

Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report: http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

MEXICO STILL A BARGAIN BUT…

MEXICO IS STILL A BARGAIN BUT…

Originally Published the Week of May 10, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

I remember as a kid and in many of my younger years accompanying family and friends across the border from California.  It was no big thing.

It was as common as telling folks you were driving to the mountains for a day.

Yes, there were those Mexico trips for fishing.  And surfing. And weekends to just hang out and eat lobster and tacos. 

And there were those trips just, “to go shopping.”

My mom, aunts and cousins loved it.  So, I’d go with them.  It was always fascinating.

This wasn’t to buy Elvis painted on black velvet or a candle-holder skull like they sold at the border.  The family loved to shop for things like belts, clothes, hats and normal things.

Things seemed “always cheaper” across the border and the American dollar went a long way.  Plus, it was fun too!

I speculate that it has always been part of the American psyche that there were always bargains in Mexico.  Whether it was shopping, activities, lodging, activities or whatever, it was an easy and economical trip to just head south.

Listen, hate to be a buzz kill.

Mexico is still a bargain and an easy vacation to make.

In fact among both American and international travelers it’s the #1 destination spot in the world.  And growing.

They can’t build hotels fast enough to meet the demand.

It’s not England, France, Japan or even the U.S. 

It’s Mexico.

But, here’s the rub.  Bring extra pesos. 

Prices have really shot up.  Just like the rest of the world. 

Being in the hospitality and travel business ourselves with our fishing operation here in La Paz, I have to admit that a lot of folks are getting rocked by sticker shock.

Everything from gas to lodging and from fishing to street tacos has gone up.

Just like other parts of the planet, inflation has Mexico by the follicles.  Whereas, normal inflation hovers around 3%.  The last 3 years it has rocketed into the low-to-mid 8% levels.

That’s the highest it’s been in more than 2 decades.

For many tourists, OK…8% is a lot.  But, it’s not a game changer.  At least it’s not deterring that many folks from still beating a path to visit Mexico.

Oh yea…and as an aside taxes have gone up as well.  No surprise.

I just read an article that said the “average” hotel room in Cabo is now $400-500 per night!  Of course there are many that are much less expensive and, obviously many that are many times more exorbitant. 

It’s an eye-opener for sure! 

It’s all relative.

Look at the prices of hotel rooms in any major U.S. City. How much is Disneyland?  How much does it cost to take the family to a nice dinner these days?  How much does a McDonald’s happy meal cost?  How much does it cost to fill gas in the family car?

Gas here in La Paz is now over $4 dollars a gallon.  Of course, if you live in California, that sounds like a deal that has gone the way of the rotary telephone and Sony Walkmans. 

But, like I said, it’s all relative.

In Mexico, if you’re only earning $10-per-day and have a family to feed, the rise in prices is crippling.

Not only does gas cost more, but everything related to that petroleum is going to bend you over as well…in the wrong way!

Anything that has to be transported costs more to the provider or supplier so simple economics 101 passes the price increase to the consumer at ground zero.

So, groceries cost more.  Utilities like water and electricity cost more.  It’s all related and relative.

Mexico is still a bargain. 

But, it depends who you’re talking to.

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s

Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 

from USA : 626-638-3383

from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

DO-IT-YOURSELF VACATION SCREW-UPS IN MEXICO

THIS ONE’S ON YOU!

DO-IT-YOURSELF VACATION SCREW-UPS!

Originally Published the Week of April 23, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

Everyone looks forward to vacations.  It gets us through all the other idiotic days of the year, right?

My wife and I have been in the fishing biz now for almost 30 years.  I’ve been in the industry over 40.  We’ve hosted thousands of visitors over years to come fishing with us in La Paz.

 I was just thinking of some of the knuckle-headed things people do to themselves to jack their vacations.

Admittedly some stuff happens.  S#*t happens to all of us no matter how careful we all are.  Personally guilty of that one.

But, then there are the things we’ve seen smart people do to clown their own vacations that could have been avoided.

When someone approaches me with an issue in Mexico, of course, we try our best to help.  Most people will try to help.  It’s natural.  We’re im the people business.

But, there are other times when I think to myself:

“Your negligence is NOT my emergency.”

Like not having your documents squared away.  It doesn’t happen often, but a few times a year, I get a panic-call from someone at the airport or at home who has:

  1. Forgotten their passport
  2. Lost their passport (and only decided to look the night before their trip)
  3. Arrives at the airport with an expired passport
  4. Never had a passport and figured their driver’s license is fine
  5. Lost or forgotten the passports of their kids or family member

Happens more often than you think.

Medications are another one.  I send out a checklist to all our clients.  I advise everyone to never send your meds with check-in luggage in case your luggage gets lost.

Many years ago, that happened to one guy.  His luggage didn’t arrive for 3 days. 

We thought he was looking kinda peaked each day. I mean, he was turning yellow!  Turns out his colostomy bags were in his luggage!

C’mon man!

Another guy “forgot” his heart medications.  He asked me to help him get a local prescription which we helped him get.  It wasn’t easy.

Then, he found out the prescription was $600 dollars!!!  And he wanted me to loan him the 600 bucks.  I don’t’ have 600 dollars to loan.   He had to go home early.  Sorry it happened, but not my problem.

That reminds me of something else.

Everyone does their best to budget for their vacation.   But did you really bring enough? 

What about unforeseen things like:

  • Tips and resort fees
  • Taxis and shuttles
  • Unexpected cancelations of flights or other weather issues
  • Big bar and food bills
  • Extra activities
  • Too many “almost free” souvenirs

Many places in Mexico do NOT take credit cards.  Many of us do NOT accept American Express either because of the fees.

 No one will accept a personal check.  Many places cannot accept cashier cheques either.

And here’s a real big one…many businesses do not and cannot accept big bills.  That’s because the Mexican banks won’t accept them. 

So, now you’re also stuck trying to break 100 dollar bills.  Good luck. 

Unless you have an account, the banks can’t help.  Hotels aren’t banks either or have limited cash on hand.  So, you’re out-of-luck and stressing. 

So you buy a t-shirt you’ll never wear just to break that bill and now you have $80 in Mexican pesos.

And here’s the biggest one we see that can be a real vacation-buster.  It’s completely avoidable.

That involves simply overdoing it.

Moderation in all things.  That includes sunshine. 

As much as it feels good to roast in that warm Mexican sun on the beach or pool, take some pre-cautions.  On more than one occasion, we’ve seen folks so charbroiled it’s painful to us just to watch.  Let alone the victim! 

Painful and potentially dangerous. 

The same can be said for hydration.  That’s not drinking enough water as well as drinking too much alcohol.

These two are probably the most common.  People hit the alcohol and forget the water…for their whole trip.

Especially that first day. 

My gosh…folks pile off the plane and hit the beach or pool and it’s full-speed ahead!  We hear the yahoo-ing and whooping. 

At first, we smile.  Glad they’re having a good time.

After awhile, we start getting worried.

For us, I gotta get these folks up early to go fishing or some other activity!  I’ve had to escort people to their hotel rooms or we’ve sometimes carried folks!

So, often, they’re not able to answer the bell the next day. 

Or in some cases, they are so intoxicated they get sick.  And they stay sick for a good part of their vacations.  They can’t answer the bell for several days!

Bad for them.  Bad for us. Bad for everyone they are with.

Know your limits.  Take it easy.

You might be ruining your vacation as well as the folks you’re travelling with.  And with a little thought, it’s all very avoidable.

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

 

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

 

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

 

_____________

 

 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

 

Website:

 

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

 

 

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
 
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

 

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

 

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

 

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

WERE THEY PULLING OUR LEG ABOUT THE WORM?

WERE THEY PULLING OUR LEG ABOUT THE WORM?

Originally Published the Week of Mar. 27, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

Back in the day…back in MY day a LONG time ago when things like this mattered, there were two guys that were always fun to have along.

One was the guy who brought the Cuervo Gold Tequila.  We thought that was the apex of tequilas back then.

The other was the really fun guy.  He brought the bottle of Mezcal.  You might remember.  Or maybe you tried not to remember!

It had that little worm at the bottom of the bottle.

As “party protocol” had it, the macho dude was the guy who got to the bottom of the bottle and ate that little squiggly thing. 

You always tried to get the new guy to do it.  Right?

Everyone told him we had all passed that “right of passage” and eaten the worm so it was HIS turn.  Of course, we were lying. 

But we would say anything to goad the newbie.   Solidarity in peer pressure!

We were all told that eating that worm had “psychedelic properties.” 

So what’s the deal with the worm? 

I decided to look into it given that mezcal is growing more popular these days.   Mezcalarias, that specialize strictly in mezcal are popping up everywhere and it’s rare to find a watering hole that doesn’t have bottles on the shelf.

Personally, I’ve found it to be a great mixer. 

Always in moderation, mind you which is a good thing.  Mezcal indeed has a higher alcohol content than tequila.  About 15% more buzz for the buck.

But, it adds a nice smokiness to cocktails and, to me, much added flavor compared to tequila.

But, don’t mix them up. 

Although both come from the agave plant, tequila is generally distilled from blue agave.  Tequila is produced by steaming the agave.

Comparatively, mezcal uses a larger variety of agave.  The plant is fire roasted in pits lined with lava rocks.  Hence, you get the smokey earthy flavors.

The story of the worm goes back to the 50’s when a mezcal distiller found a worm larvae in a batch of brew and thought it added extra flavor. 

It was also a nice marketing move which was soon copied by other manufacturers.

acbbdbe8d6adf6513e05f2cd6f298322

In reality, it’s not really a worm per se.  It’s an insect larvae that they say tastes a bit like chicken (why is that always the case?).  To be more precise, it’s the redworm agave moth.

I did read another study where test subjects said it tasted like almonds.  Whatever…

But, even in the party days, I’ve never seen anyone who actually admitted to chewing the darn thing.

However, the worm is often a popular culinary additive.  Roasted and crushed, I’m told it adds some nice texture and flavor to regional  Mexican dishes.

Gusanos

It’s perfectly safe to eat. Gulp all you want.

However…is it hallucinogenic?

Nah.  Someone was fibbing. 

There’s no proof that it has any such properties.  However,  if you make it to the bottom of the bottle to eat the worm, I have no doubt you’ll be seeing things!

On the contrary, there are some who believe that the worm has aphrodisiac affects. 

Again, if you make it to the bottom of the bottle, you probably will feel 10-feet-tall; bullet-proof and eternally attractive. 

Clinical studies have shown that when consumed by animals, there have been some aphrodisiac affects.  But, never in humans.

I did find some clinical benefits of drinking Mezcal besides getting a faster buzz.

It reduces cholesterol which is the main factor in heart disease so you can say it helps prevent heart attacks.

Surprisingly, I also discovered that you are less likely to get a hangover after drinking mezcal.

Mezcal is made of polysaccharides.  They transform into the body faster than other alcohol so begins to disintegrate as soon as it comes in contact with your mouth. 

I don’t understand that, but its kinda good to know.  Bigger brains than mine study this stuff.

Keep it moderate!

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

HAND ON HEART – It Still Gets To Me

HAND ON HEART – It Still Gets To Me

Originally Published the Week of Mar. 10, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

OK, this is not really about Mexico like my usual columns.  Or maybe it is.

My wife, Jilly, and I have been on the road now about 2 months travelling the U.S. doing the usual fishing/ hunting shows and conventions across the country.  Lots of road hours.

With our booth, cat and clothes bundled up and stuffed in our Suburban, we’ve now done shows this year in Dallas, Reno, Salt Lake City, San Diego and Nashville.  We just wrapped it up in Southern California at the Pacific Coast Sportfishing Show at the Orange Co. Fairgrounds.

A few minutes before the show started with hundreds of vendors ready go in their booths  and a couple thousand attendees anxiously waiting at the gates to go in…

A giant American flag was unfurled and a beautiful woman’s voice sang a live version of the Star Spangled Banner over the fairground’s speaker system.  

Everyone stopped.  Oh Say Can You See?

Trucker hats and cowboy hats came off.  Beanies and visors got placed over hearts with hands. 

Guys with scruffy beards and overalls standing next to millennials, Generation Xer’s, surfer dudes, deckhand-types, salty old guys, guys and gals in camo or cutoffs, families, boomer folks in fashion… were all standing at silent attention staring at a massive American flag slowly fluttering in the chilly morning breeze.

Middle class…high class…no class.  Didn’t matter.  All standing together.

Next to me, a hipster with a man-bun and black skinny-legged stovepipe pants had his hand over his heart next to an older gent with a baseball that that said “Vietnam Veteran.  He was standing at full salute. 

There was a family that looked Middle Eastern (the wife had a burka) with an African American family standing nearby as well.  I could see the wife mouthing the words…

“What so proudly we hail…”

Many folks of Asian and Latino descent also standing and saluting in their own ways.

Dangit…My wife and I both got teary-eyed.  We always do.

And as that great song is playing, “Oh say does that star-spangled banner…”

I’m thinking, why can’t we all get along?  Why are we so devisive?  Why does it take some national tragedy or emergency to bring us all together?

Look at us all standing together at this very moment.

However, over 4 days of the show, folks coming to our booth to talk about fishing in La Paz.  And they just can’t help themselves.

Over conversation about airflights into Mexico or Mexican restaurants or catching marlin…comments get interjected about our politics, their politicians, our presidents and their presidents,  religions and economies.

Not little comments either, but combative, inflammatory and  vociferous opinions.  Fighting words.  Not directed at me, but surely loud enough for the opinions to be heard by anyone within earshot.

As if they were just looking for an opportunity…any opportunity to wiggle in a belligerent opinion.  Amazing.

What do street tacos have to do with election fraud?  Or how is fishing in a panga related to conspiracy theories about covid or supply chain issues?  The size of a dorado and corruption?

C’mon, man. 

And of course, everyone of an opposite belief is an “idiot.”

Sigh…

I live and work in another country.  That country has given me a nice little career and livelihood.  But I’m still proudly American.

Inwardly, I laugh. 

Check out what it’s like for most folks living across the border.  Politics, the judicial system, the economy, education…if Americans could only see and experience what it’s like
“over there.” 

There’s a reason why so many folks are trying to get across to the U.S.  (A completely different discussion for sure.)

But, we are so blessed as Americans.  Yea, the struggle is real.  For all it’s monumental problems, what a darned fine country. 

And for one shining moment, standing in the chilly morning breeze listening to the national anthem and facing a giant old glory, it felt especially good.

To look around and think that for all our outward differences…for all our crazy opinions…we could still draw together over an old worn song that still has meaning.  

And that if it ever came to it, we’d all have each other’s backs.

That’s my story…

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s

Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 

from USA : 626-638-3383

from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

BLUE PLATE SPECIAL

BLUE PLATE SPECIAL

Originally Published the Week of Sept. 28, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

Several columns ago, I wrote a piece regarding when Mexican food NOT Mexican food.  It mentioned things like nachos, pre-formed taco shells and chili having non-Mexican origins.

I was pleasantly surprised at the number of comments I received from readers.

As one reader laughingly wrote, “You personally destroyed my entire concept of Mexican food and so many of my favorite dishes!”

But, as I’ve heard so often, our American concept of various ethnic and nationalized food is often skewed by what we are exposed to in the U.S.

For example, I could have probably written about Chinese or Italian food being completely different from our American experiences if we actually visited those countries.

Not withstanding, several of the e-mails, I received actually asked, where I would personally find the best Mexican food.

Amazingly, once again, it’s not found in a traditional spot per se.

Yes, it’s restaurant food.  However, it’s very atypical to what Americans visualize as a restaurant and they are pretty easy to find.

They dot the landscape especially along the highways and backroads, little towns and pueblos. Often, they are stand-alone solitary non-descript buildings. 

Sometimes they are actually marked with a crude sign announcing “Restaurante” or “Lonche” (Lunch). 

Other times, you just have to know.

A tell-tale weathered Coca-Cola sign or Modelo Beer logo nailed to a post or painted on the wall is a pretty good indication.

There may or may not be cars parked outside.  Don’t count on it.

Very often it’s a concrete slab with half-walls and some kind of patio with plastic chairs.  Other times, it’s really nothing more than a big extra room in the cinderblock home of a family.

139044934b08bcaf7771a398fdcdb54f_-mexico-baja-california-colonia-santa-anita-60484-loncheria-rositahtm

There could be one big table.  There could be several small tables.  Nothing really seems to match unless they are the universal plastic tables and chair given out by the beer companies.

But the room itself often has the hominess of someone’s big living room.  Often it is.  Yup…there’s a TV on the wall or counter.

There might be a small religious shrine to the Virgin of Guadalupe with a votive candle in the corner.

Or it could be the back patio that looks out over an expanse of Baja desert and rock.  And lots of scrub brush and cactus. 

Oh yea…and maybe a dog or chicken or two.

C’mon in and sit down.

You will never find these little places on Google or Yelp or other social media platform. Forget Facebook or looking for a website.

Don’t even count on a name. 

One of my favorite spots is just an address.  Loncheria 5.6 km a Playa Piedra (Lunch place 5.6 kilometers to Rocky Beach.)

Don’t expect to see a menu.  Or something tacked on the wall. 

There is none.

And therein is the beauty.

We Americans are accustomed to restaurant where we have choices or have a selection of things to eat and prepared for us.

In Mexico…especially in the outlying fronteras…a restaurant basically means you have the luxury and means to have someone cook for you.  That’s it!

Kinda like getting invited to your auntie’s house or your grandma’s place.  And Uncle Gerardo and Cousin Juanito will be helping out

You know you’re gonna get fed and get a meal, but they’re gonna cook what they have!  The meal will be whatever is in the frig!

r05

There’s always beans that have probably been on the stove for hours or days. Seasoned and savory. 

There’s always amazing tortillas that did NOT come out’ve a plastic bag, but made the way they’ve been making tortillas for generations.

And you usually do have somewhat of a choice!

How do you want your eggs?  Fried?  Or really fried?

Maybe some rice?

Did you want some fresh ranch cheese? Or not.

Red salsa or green salsa?

Always hand made.  Family recipes.  Nothing out’ve a jar or can.  And definitely not like that salsa in the commercial “from New York City!”

Oh wait…

They have some fish today.  Or maybe it’s some fresh machaca beef.   Or some rich brothy pozole pork stew!

It’s whatever they have and whatever is fresh.  And cooked the only way they know how to cook it.

 

Or, like one of my favorite places in a little fishing village near Bahia Magdalena, the little grandmother always apologizes.

She only has two choices every time I go there.  Shrimp or lobster?  That’s what she has and that’s what she offers.

275154164_721753075656638_7383167505799451134_n

Are you kidding?  She gives me both!

No apology necessary. 

Whatever it is, you can always wrap your tortillas around it or shovel it into your mouth “local style” with the tortilla.

And you  can always count on cold beer of some type.  Usually Coke.  No Pepsi. And always hot coffee. 

And, it’s not unusual for them to come over and ask if you want more and then bring the pot over and ladle the rest of the pot or pan onto your plate!

And it’s always great and you never ever leave hungry. 

There’s no bill.  Mama tell you how much the meal costs. No credit cards accepted. 

Pesos only please.  Don’t expect change either.  You might be the only folks who have stopped by all day. 

Don’t worry.  The meal costs pesos.  My lobster dinner with 2 tails AND the shrimp would cost about 3 bucks.

And believe it or not, no tip is expected.  But don’t dare walk out without leaving something!  You’ll always get a grand smile.

…and leave with one as well.  And a full happy tummy!

That’s my story

Jonathan

______________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

 

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

 

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

 

_____________

 

 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

 

Website:

 

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

 

 

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
 
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

 

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

 

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

 

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things you never had the courage to try.” 

Read Full Post »

NO BATTERIES NEEDED

NO BATTERIES NEEDED

Originally Published the Week of Feb. 13, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

Many years ago, when hand-held GPS’s first came out, I proudly and anxiously took my new device out on the water.  I was already living and working in Baja so I dailed-up my favorite captain, Victor,  who was also my panga fleet manager at the time.

Just to put this in context, this was before Google maps and smart phones and every electronic doo-dad we have nowadays that can pinpoint a needle in a haystack.

This was almost 20 years ago.

Boy, I was excited.  Technology at my fingertips.  Imagine, a Global Positioning System just like the government and military had.  It would put me on all my favorite fishing spots!

What a concept!

I showed it to Victor and told him, “Someday all the captains need to get one of these.”

He laughed and shrugged. Yea, right.

Well…I’ll show him.  Seeing is believing!

So, out we went.  Oh yea!  I had programmed in all kinds of waypoints that I had found on various fishing maps.

And then my little electronic wonder, with all it’s orbiting satellites, beeped “stop here!”

So we did.  The hotspot!

Victor cut the outboard.  I looked about the flat morning sea. 

We were maybe 200 yards from the beach just outside a little bay.  Cerralvo Island in the distance.  Famous sands of Punta Arenas just to the north.

I baited a hook with a live sardine with the anticipation of a kid at Christmas.  I couldn’t get it into the water fast enough. 

I tossed it into the drift and I got ready to be pulled out’ve my socks. 

I told Victor in Spanish, “C’mon, amigo.  Get a bait into the water!”

He laughed and sat down on the gunwale.  Folded his arms. “No, gracias. Quiero mirarte.  I want to watch you instead. No thanks.” 

Well, I was ready.  I’m gonna get hit so hard.  Here it comes!

…and nothing.

…and more nothing.

Let me check the GPS again. Maybe I’m holding it wrong.

Yup, the satellites say this is the spot alright.  Maybe I need to change my bait.

Reel up.  Pin a new live sardine on the hook and let ‘er fly.

Now, we’re cooking with gas!  Now, the rod is going to get torn right outta my hands.  Here we go…

…and nothing.

…and still more nothing.

I look back at Victor. Smirking and smiling. Arms still crossed across his chest sitting there being very entertained.

I hated seeing that stupid-a#% grin!

“Que pasa, amigo? Hay algo mal con su machinito?” he laughs.  “What’s happening? Is something wrong with your little machine?” 

“Possible se quebro!” He adds with a hiked eyebrow.  “Maybe it’s broken!” 

More laughs. Actually more like a guffaw.

“Si, pienso que no esta funcionando.”  Yes, I think it is not working. I responded in frustrating Spanish.

Yes, that must be it.

He stands up off the gunwale. Big exhale.

He gazes shoreward to the north.  Then a slow turn south.  He stretches his calloused tanned fingers about 6 inches between thumb and forefinger.

Holds his fingers at arms length.

He lines up an old shack on the beach.

He smiles.  And he winks at me.

Starts the outboard.  And moves the panga about 30 yards closer to the beach.

Cuts the motor.

“Aqui, amigo.  Ponga su linea aqui,” he cackles.  Put your line in here.  “Vamos a ver que pasa”. Let’s see what happens.

New bait on the hook.  Line in the water.

Within seconds, line is ripping from my reel.  I set the brake. 

FISH ON! BENDO!

I look back at Victor.  Still smirking.  Arms across his chest again.  He shrugs his shoulders and laughs his self-satisfied laugh.

Pretty proud of himself.  He got me.

He beat my techno-toy with some simple triangulation borne of 30 years on the water.

As I fight the tuna on the end of my line, Victor busies himself at the stern of the panga.  I hear him say to himself, but loud enough for me to hear.

“Soy mejor de jugetes electronicos.  Ellos se quebran.  Victor nunca!  No faltan baterias.

(I’m better than electronic toys.  They break.  Victor never breaks.  And I don’t need batteries.)

…and that laugh again! So entertained by himself.

“No baterias pero a veces una cerveza” (…no batteries but maybe at times a beer)

Victor said this more loudly looking at me …and then at the ice chest …and back again to me.

I put away my GPS.  Go ahead amigo.  You earned it.  I smiled back and gave him a thumbs-up.

…and grab the gaff too.  I got color.

Denny Chin two victor tuna yellowtail 8-19

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s

Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 

from USA : 626-638-3383

from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

WHEN MEXICAN FOOD ISN’T MEXICAN FOOD

THINK AGAIN!

WHEN MEXICAN FOOD ISN’T MEXICAN FOOD

Originally Published the Week of Feb. 13, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

One of the most common questions we get living in Mexico from visitors is “Where can we find REAL Mexican food?”

That kinda makes me grin. 

For one, we own our own restaurant in La Paz.  Yes, we serve tacos, but I wouldn’t call the rest of our menu “typical Mexican” cuisine.

Anyway, when I ask folks what they consider REAL Mexican food, I get the usual responses you might expect.  However, most of the responses are based on gringo-ized versions and concepts.

The main thing is that you’re probably NOT going to find anything resembling that chain-eatery in your city back home.  And you DEFINITELY will not find any crazy creation you’ll find at Taco Bell like a “chalupa” or “nacho cheese dorito loco taco.” 

I personally love ‘em,  but they surely aren’t authentic Mexican by any stretch of the imagination.

So, here’s my list of things that come to mind you’ll probably not find in your average restaurant in Mexico.  Sorry to be a buzz kill because I’m sure some of your favorites are on my list:

CHILI – The first thing that comes to mind.  Years ago, I threw a party for friends and made chili dogs. A sure party hit. 

Everyone looked disgustedly at this saucy morass of meat and beans and WIPED IT OFF THE HOT DOGS!  Turns out no one knew what chili was and I found out later it’s a cowboy Tex-Mex thing not something you’d find normally in Mexico.

CHIPS – This one hurts!  We’re so used to getting a bottomless basket of chips before the meal ever arrives.   Not so in Mexico unless the restaurant is really a gringo-ized tourist restaurant.  Or, maybe you’ll get a little bowl that has a dozen chips.  That’s it.  Ask for salsa.  It’s extra.

HARD SHELL TACOS – In Mexico, it’s a heated soft-tortilla wrapped around whatever goodness is being served. The idea of a pre-formed crunchy hard-shell is purely American. 

There is something called a “taco dorado.”  This is not a fish taco.  Rather, the filling is put together. Then the whole thing is deep fried in hot oil.  I’ve sometimes heard this called a “Los Angeles Street Taco.”  They’re good and you’ll find them here and there.  Think Jack-in-the-Box super taco except even better. 

FILLED TACOS – We’re used to having a taco stuffed with ground beef usually.  You won’t find ground beef tacos in Mexico. 

We are also used to having our tacos pre-loaded with cheese, lettuce and tomatoes.  In Mexico, the soft tortilla has the protein.  Then it’s up to you to go to the salsa bar and load it with whatever you want.  This is where the magic begins! However, do not expect to find shredded cheese as part of the choices.

NACHOS – It’s popping up more frequently.  Not only at tourist restaurants, but it’s becoming a local favorite as well, especially among kids.  Who doesn’t like all the gooey cheese dripping off chips and topped with other yumminess?  But, most local-local restaurants will not have it on the menu although they will probably be happy to throw it together.

Legend has it that nachos had their genesis along the border when some picky army wives went to a restaurant after it was already closed and the inventive owner threw something together for them that just exploded in popularity.

TACO BOWL SALADS – WHAAAAT???  We tried to introduce them at our own La Paz restaurant and our staff couldn’t even fathom what we were talking about.  We dropped it off our menu.   No one knows what it is or why anyone would do such a thing.  A taco shaped like a bowl?  Really?

FAJITAS – Another Tex-Mex concoction.  Get some meat and throw it in a pan with whatever else you have hanging around in the frig.  It’s the equivalent of Chinese Chop Suey…which is about as Chinese as Fajitas are Mexican.

BURRITOS – Yes, another culinary lie!  Those big-as-your-forearm wraps of everything yummy are American.  You’ll find “burros” (big donkeys) here-and-there that are somewhat similar but not as elaborate, but most Mexican places will have small hand-sized tortillas with fillings.  In which case it’s really a taco now!

TAMALES– Found occasionally from street vendors, but rarely found in a restaurant.  Too time-intensive.  Someone sells them, but you’ll have to go looking.

ROLLED TACOS (Taquitos) – Go to San Diego to find them. Go to El Paso. We have found them in Utah. But, not Mexico.

My wife’s favorite.  Can’t find ‘em anywhere.  Whenever we’ve travelled in Mexico and have asked for them, we get a look from the waiter like “WHY WOULD YOU WANT TO ROLL A TACO INTO A TUBE AND DEEP FRY IT? “ We gave up .  We make our own at home instead.

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s

Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 

from USA : 626-638-3383

from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

LEMONS & LEMONADE

LEMONS & LEMONADE

Originally Published the Week of Jan. 14, 2023 in Western Outdoor Publications

No doubt, Mexico is a great place to escape to, especially in the winter.  This year, in particular, with all the storms criss-crossing the U.S. and repeatedly battering some areas, it’s a no-brainer.

The idea of shedding your thermals, rain gear or snow-boots and sticking your bare toes into warm sand with any icy cold one in your hand is awfully appealing.

There’s just one thing wrong with that visualization.

Folks think that nasty weather respects the political borders that separate the two countries.  No, the weather does not simply stop at the border.

If there’s weather north of the border, there’s weather south of the border as well.  Generally, it’s not as severe, but there can be enough weather to impact your vacation plans whether it’s that sunset booze cruise, a snorkel trip, and of course, fishing.

The sun is generally out so you can keep your toes in the sand.  And for sure  it’s going to be warmer than South Dakota and dryer than California or Oregon, but beware.

Waters can be rough and windy.  Or, at worst, your trip could get cancelled.  It definitely won’t look like the post card or website photos that enticed you to visit in the first place.

So, what recourse do you have?

Listen, common sense.

We know you REALLY want to get out on the water to do whatever it is you planned to do. 

There are unscrupulous operators and outfitters who know darned well they shouldn’t go out and  still take your money.  They will give you an abbreviated trip then apologize and go back to port.

Or, they’ll try to do the best they can and gut-it-out and everyone gets seasick and has a miserable time.

Or, simply cancels things and is honest and says it’s too windy and dangerous or the port has been closed.  And hopefully refunds everyone’s money.

Use common sense.  If it’s looks too rough, it’s really not worth it to get seasick and have a terrible time. Believe me. 

If you’re going fishing and the captain himself says you shouldn’t go out, don’t go out!  The guy wants your business more than anything. 

But, the guy know his waters and if an experienced waterman like him says not to go, no one is more disappointed than him.

The best thing to do in any of those situations, short of getting your money back, is staying flexible with your schedule.  Especially important during this time of year.

Check if there’s a different day you can go out and get a credit or rain check.  Most reputable operators will jump at the chance.  They want you to have a good time as much as you want to have a good time.

And they certainly need the business.

And no one wants to go out there if it’s unsafe.  That’s a given.  Don’t take that chance either. 

Whatever amount you paid, it’s not worth it to jeopardize anyone’s safety.  Even if you’re not getting a refund. Walk away.  

One other big thing…

We never travel without travel insurance.  We recommend all of our clients who come to fish with us in La Paz to purchase it as well.

You just never know.  And it’s very economical.

Believe me, if you get cancelled for some reason, refunds are generally non-existent.  Weather is part of being on the water.  No one’s fault.  It can’t be controlled.

But, even if you do get a refund, it might take time and some wrangling to get all or part of your dinero back.  Don’t count on it.  

Travel insurance can be a big help.

Whatever happens and you do get cancelled…

Go sit on the beach.  Console yourself that it still beats being on the freeway or back at work.

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

CAN YOUR CITY SAY THE SAME?

CAN YOUR CITY SAY THE SAME?

Originally Published the Week of Dec. 27, 2022 in Western Outdoor Publications

Tongue-in-cheek.  Are you safer on vacation than at home? 

Over the almost 30 years we have lived in Baja and run our Tailhunter Sportfishing operation, it’s not uncommon for us to get questions about safety.

Understandable. 

Mexico has that seemingly unshakable reputation of unmitigated lawlessness.  When you tell people you’re going to Mexico or you live in Mexico you here, “You’re going to…MEXICO?” “You live in MEXICO?”

(Their voices always go up on the world MEXICO!).

I might as well have said I like driving with my eyes closed or like swimming nekkid with pirhanas.

I won’t deny that there are some big issues, but it seems if a tourist has their watch stolen, it ends up on CNN. It’s an easy target.

And yes there’s violence.  But, what city these days doesn’t have issues with violence.  (Hello Chicago!)

We have friends in the U.S. terrified of visiting Mexico. 

But likewise, we have many Mexican friends afraid of visiting the U.S.  Can’t say I blame them.

This is because like U.S. media, Mexico TV broadcasts the robberies, mass shootings (is there ever a week this doesn’t happen in some mall, concert, school, etc), police issues, racial issues, riots, homelessness.

I wouldn’t want to visit either.

Every year for more than 3 decades, my wife and I do the fishing and hunting shows and expos all over the U.S.  A different show each week usually in some big convention center.

We’re there in our booth promoting our La Paz operation and thousands of people attend these events.

We usually do 10-14 shows over three months driving back and forth criss-crossing the U.S.

These have included shows in San Diego, Salt Lake City, Portland, Spokane, Boise, Phoenix, Denver, Bozeman, Seattle, Long Beach, Sacramento and many more.

There are some shows we will NOT be attending for the first time in many years simply because of the rampant crime we saw.  Some of it first-hand as we were victimized in one city and we saw a number of friends and fellow outfitters also victimized.

Openly.  In broad daylight.

We honestly saw more in 3 months on the road last year in the U.S. than we have seen in 30 years in Mexico.  And the police (many of whom are good friends told us) are largely powerless to stop it.

It was very sad and sobering.

So, you want to ask us how safe it is in Mexico. 

Well, I think there’s a reason it’s the #1 travel destination in the world right now.  Not just for Americans, but for international travelers as well.

Mexican destinations like Cabo, Puerto Vallarta, Cancun and others are breaking attendance records for visitors.  Cabo alone hosted more than 3 million visitors this past year shattering previous statistics.

And here’s some interesting stats that just came out…

In Baja, homicides have dropped 95% since 2018.

Car theft is down by 74%.  Burglaries have decreased by an impressive 63% while street crime such as pickpocketing, muggings and violent theft have dropped by 52%.

I wonder how many American cities or states can claim those statistics.

Authorities attribute the drop to increased presence of law enforcement including police and national guard/ army.  They also point to increased funding for such activities plus U.S. support in terms of better training.

Logistical improvements as well have increased.  They have added much street lighting and security cameras are more prevalent everywhere.  More are planned to add an extra measure of security, especially in tourist areas.

Common sense is still the best security no matter where you go.  Don’t forget your brain just because you’re on vacation.

Don’t leave your wallet accidentally on the bar top.

Don’t go walking down dark alleys or doing things you shouldn’t be doing.

Don’t go flashing your jewelry or cash wad out in the open.

Same as you would at home. 

All that aside,  don’t let it stop you from going on vacation and enjoying yourself in Mexico.

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s

Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter Sportfishing, P.O. Box 159, Hewitt TX 76643

Phones: 

from USA : 626-638-3383

from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »