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Archive for the ‘chubasco’ Category

MY SMALL THINGS THEIR BIG THINGS

MY SMALL THINGS THEIR BIG THINGS

Originally Published the Week of Sept. 14, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

         I’m sitting here reveling in my surroundings for a bit as I write this week’s column in my office here in La Paz.

         We just got through Hurricane Olaf that smacked into Baja down here about three days ago and really gave us a spin.

         Funny how things work out here.  Almost a month ago we all watched as Hurricane Nora approached us.  It was all about the same time that Ida hit the U.S. Gulf states.

         For our days, we prepped and stayed vigilant.  You just never know.

        I had my batteries for flashlights; extra waters and masking tape for the windows.  aWe had lots of junk food piled up that could be eaten right from the bag without having to cook in case we lost power (Pringles, Doritos, Chips Ahoy).  And of course bottles of wine.

       We call this “survival eating.”  Not a healthy thing in there!  I’ve been through quite a few hurricanes and it’s hurricane sustenance food.   

       If you have to be shut in, might as well enjoy it.

       I had warned all our fishing clients that we might lose some fishing days.

       Anyway, after all this prepping…

       Nora turned out to be nothing more than a big-weather fart.  Some strong winds.  Some big southern swells.  Not a drop of rain. 

       Actually, kind of a letdown after all the anxiety.

       This week, we did the same thing. 

       We watched Olaf approach.  All the computer and weather experts predicted it would come up the Pacific side of Baja and make a 90-degree turn out to the Pacific Ocean.

       Nothing to really worry about.  Totally benign. A cream-puff storm.

       So, we didn’t do much in terms of prepping

       Last Thursday morning, I launched all our fishing boats and client.  It was early . Seas were flat calm.  Not a hint of wind.  Skies were so clear I could see stars.

       However, just a few hours later, it was like suddenly someone had flipped a switch.  Out’ve nowhere, the heavens opened with huge blasts of thunder.  Lightning bolts could be seen striking in the bay in front of us.

       Mexican apocalypse.

       The rain didn’t drizzle to start.  I came in buckets from the get-go.  Winds whipped trees and everyone caught unawares was literally running and diving for cover like they do in war movies when the fighter planes sweep in.

       Over the next 48-hours, Hurricane Olaf turned into a Category 2 storm.  We had 12-15 inches of rain in less than 24 hours.  We had winds to 90 mph and gusts up to 150. 

       Trees were uprooted.  Roofs torn off. Boats were sunk. Roads were flooded. Arroyos ran like rivers.

       Fortunately, I haven’t heard of any fatalities or serious injuries.

       But, it DID leave us with no power or water.

       And that’s why I’m sitting here now writing about it.

       In this modern world we take a lot for granted. 

       I can always get a glass of water.  Hot showers no problem.  Need to call someone, the cellphone is there.  Need to check something?  Pop the laptop.

       Tough day?   An icy margarita or beer is at arms-length.

       Hungry?  Open the frig and cook up something in the microwave or stovetop.

       Night comes? Turn on the light.

       As I write this, there’s still folks here in town that don’t have water, power or cellphone/ internet from the storm.

       Off-the-grid.

       We were like that for 2 days and we just lights and electric about 12 hours ago.  Trying to work in the office with a flashlight or navigate our apartment with candles just doesn’t cut it.

       Even more importantly, only about 2 hours ago, we got AIR CONDITIONING!

       I guess I’ve gotten to be a whimp in my old age.

       However, when it’s 102 degrees during the day and 92 at night and the humidity level is 85%, and you have nothing but candles and flashlights, it melts even the strongest of men.

       We have our breaking points, right? Imagine sitting in your bathroom fully-clothed with only the hot water on your shower going full blast. You are engulfed in steam.

       And you’re locked in the bathroom for 2 or 3 days.  Try to sleep.  Try to function.

       That’s what it’s like.

       And so, I’m able to type this column while sitting in blessed cool air and my laptop is plugged in and finally re-charging.  There are lights.  The food in the frig isn’t turning to muck.  Sweat isn’t dripping onto my laptop keyboard.

       There’s still a lot of folks in town without water or power.

       We had 46 clients/ fishermen here in town also locked in hotel rooms with no power or water in some cases.  We also had to deal with that as they put on game-faces and had to deal with it as well.

       But, now that we personally are back in the light, I realize (again) just how much we take for granted.  We push buttons on remotes or gadgets or turn handles and all the conveniences of modern life are at our fingertips for our comfort and ease.

       And  every now and then, mother nature reminds us what it’s like without that ability.

       And then it make me think that there’s people right here in this Mexican city that NEVER have those things.  Basic services that we never even think of.

       I do know folks here in town that live by flashlights and lanterns in the night.  I know folks that have to get their water in buckets from a public faucet to bring to their homes for cooking and washing and cleaning.

       There’s no tapping a button or flipping a switch.  There’s no knob or handle to turn.  It’s like this for them 24/7. 

       And, I’m grateful and blessed at this moment.  I have very little to complain about for even a few hours without all my comforts.  

       Ultimately, it’s not an emergency.  It’s an inconvenience not to have these luxuries because that’s what they are. 

       To many others, it’s just another day without. 

       Very humbling.

That’s my story…

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

    

Read Full Post »

THAT “A-HA” MOMENT

THAT “A-HA” MOMENT

Originally Published the Week of Aug. 22, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

       I’ve been watching fishermen (of both genders) for almost 50 years now. 

       Working as a guide; a deckhand; on TV shows; as a fishing instructor and as a fleet owner now in Baja for almost 30 of those years, I’ve seen a wonderful lot of folks with rods and reels in their hands.

         It’s great going out on the water with fishing veterans.  Anglers know their stuff.  It’s well-oiled fishing. 

        Lots of muscle memory.  Gear is locked in.  Technique is dialed-in.  No wasted motions.  Let’s just fish!

         But then there’s the really fun fishing for me.

         And that’s with first timers or folks who really don’t have that much experience.

         It’s often a day of tangled lines and too many thumbs.  Backlashes and upside-down reels.  Too much intensity and lack of intensity. 

        Lots of anxiety and, unfortunately, sometimes lost fish.  Too much expectation or not knowing at all what to expect.

         But, for me it’s fun!  It’s the best time.

         For these folks the bar isn’t set that high.

         It’s often their first time or a rare time and they just don’t have other experiences to compare this to. 

         I won’t hear about how the fish are bigger in Australia or about all the fish they caught off the Grand Banks.  They’re not going to compare fishing here to battling giant lake trout in Canada.

         Nah.

         By the same token, they’re not going to compare me to their fishing guide in Argentina or that grizzly old-timer on the flats of Key West.  I’ll have to be really bad to look like a doofus in their eyes.

         They just wanna have some fun in the sun. 

         Almost any fish will be their biggest or the most.  Or the funnest. Or even the funniest!

         When a fish is hooked it can be all “arms and elbows” and “get outta the way!” with lots of laughs and big eyes and straining arms.  Lines going every-which way and lots of “coaching!”

         “Follow your fish!”

        

         “Keep the line tight!”

         “Turn the handle!” (The OTHER way!)

         “Lift the rod!”

         Sometimes everyone is yelling at once and I often feel sorry for the poor angler be it a guy, a gal or a kid .  They’re  holding on for dear life and trying to process all the information.  All while trying NOT to make a mistake or lose the fish.

         It’s sometime just too much!

         I’ve noticed that kids are very coachable.  Wives and girlfriends are more coachable than their husbands or boyfriends.  They are even better when the husband or boyfriend is at the other end of the boat and not watching them so closely.

         Guys can be a little different.  Sometimes they go all “macho” and figure they can just overcome any fish with brute strength and muscle.  Guys can be less inclined to listen to any instructions.  They will “bend the fish to their will” and “beat the fish into submission!” 

         It’s a guy thing!  Just the way we are.

         Even some anglers that I see year-after-year can need a lot of coaching and instructions. 

         Things that veteran anglers take for granted often continue to be lessons in frustration year-after-year for some of the regular anglers we see. 

         Things like tying a hook correctly or using a bait.

         Things like properly winding the line on the reel or keeping lines directly in front of them.

         Or the proper rhythm of fighting a fish.  Lifting the rod then using the reel to wind down as the fish comes up.   Just using their gear and technology to their advantage.

         I give them all credit for trying and just being out there and still enjoying the heck out’ve themselves.  It makes it some of the most enjoyable of times for me to be on the water.

         But one of the best rushes is that “Ah-HAH” moment.

         It’s when it all comes together.  For some it happens pretty quickly.  For others it takes awhile.  Sometimes years after grinding. 

         The important thing is they kept at it.

         You remember. 

         It’s that feeling when your dad finally let go of you and you realized you were peddling your bike by yourself down the street. 

Or you realized you were driving on the street all by yourself and not thinking about it anymore.

         It happens when someone learns to play an instrument.

         Or your two left feet disappeared and you’re actually dancing.

         Or you watch your kid suddenly realize he or she is reading. 

         And they realize it too.

         Or your toddler is running and not all wobbly and clumsy across the living room floor.  So THAT’S what these legs are for!

         It suddenly just all comes together.  And it can happen at any moment.

         No more over-analyzing.  No more over-thinking.  Pure muscle memory and enjoyment.

         It’s when the “student” realizes, “Hey, I got this!”

         It’s like that with fishing and I see it all the time and it’s great. 

         Yea…you got this!

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

TRAVEL TO MEXICO SOARS…Planes not so much!

          Mexico has become the go-to place for Americans as things open up.   It’s an easy get-away.  It’s economical.  It’s easy to get home.

         More Americans are choosing Mexico over the rest of the Covid-recovering world.

         Travel to Mexico is booming in all the usual places.  Cancun, Puerta Vallarta. Cozumel.  Cabo San Lucas. 

         It might not be back to where it was pre-2020, but it’s surely trending that way.  There are reports that flight travel, in general, is just about where it used to be.

         Just one problem.

         The airlines weren’t quite ready for it to boom back this much or this fast.

         Therefore, just as summer travel is hitting it’s stride, travelers are finding there’s some disconcerting hurdles to straddle

         Frankly, flights are getting delayed, changed and canceled with regularity.  Most recently American Airlines, Southwest and others have been cancelling over 100 flights per day. This does not begin to count the flights that are changed, delayed or re-routed.

         Insofar as my wife and I have dozens of clients per week flying here to La Paz to fish with our fleet, I would venture to say that at least 30% have had their flights changed…often several times from the original…and sometimes at the last minute.

         Maybe 40% have delayed flights where they either had unexpected waits at the airport or while sitting on the plane.

         Perhaps 10% have had their flights outright cancel.  Arriving a day or two later than planned, this has created issues with losing hotel nights as well as activities such as fishing. 

         If a replacement flight can even be found.  With many flights full, it’s not always a possibility.  Also, not all airlines fly every day.

         Going home to the U.S. has sometimes been an issue as well, although usually not as much.

         A big problem has been with connecting flights.  If one connecting flight is cancelled or extensively delayed, then there is no way for a passenger to make their next flight in a timely fashion.

         To some degree, the airlines point to the spat of bad weather that has hit the U.S. since the beginning of the year.

         However, not withstanding Mother Nature’s capricious whims, the bigger problem is a result of Covid.

         Many airlines layed-off thousands of employees last year.  Many employees were encouraged to accept retirement packages.

         Now with travel zooming back, like many industries, there’s a shortage of employees.

         Running an airlines is a little more complicated than teaching someone to flip burgers.

         One doesn’t suddenly find or train flight attendants in the classified section.  You can’t train a jet pilot overnight.  Aircraft mechanics and maintenance personnel don’t attend a 1 week night-class to get certified.  Ground crews can’t be found on Craig’s List.

         So, it’s just one more thing to keep an eye out for.

         There are several things you can do.

         For one, don’t assume the airline is going to tell you about changes.  Seems kinda logical and good business, but that’s not always the case.

I’ve had several clients who were never informed of changes until THE DAY of TRAVEL.

         I’ve had several others who never found out until they were AT THE AIRPORT.

         One was told, “Well…we’re sorry.  We tried to call you yesterday and also sent an e-mail, but no one answered.”  That’s right up there with “The check is in the mail.”

         Do yourself a favor and check…constantly!  Especially as the trip gets closer, don’t be the person who turns off their e-mails and instant messages the last day they leave the office.  Be pro-active and avoid surprises.

         Be prepared for the possibility of delay. 

         Bring a book.  Bring your medications.  Bring a jacket.  If there’s a bunch of delays and your flight isn’t until the next day, just assume that any nearby hotel will be full or just not worth the hassle. 

So, figure out what you’re gonna do for a few hours sitting in an airport chair or in the restaurant or bar.

         One of those goofy neck pillows isn’t a bad idea.  Even if you’re not having to spend time in the airport, if you’re stuck sitting on the tarmac in your plane for an extra hour or two, you’ll be grateful you had a neck pillow.

         The biggest thing to do is something I have advocated for years. 

         It’s trip insurance.  Google it up . There’s a zillion different companies and plans that will very economically insure pretty much anything on your vacation to missed flights; to missed kayak trips; to lost hotel nights or other plans .

         A week has not gone by lately where I was not assisting one of our clients help file a claim for compensation because of an airline SNAFU. 

         Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. 

That’s my story!

Jonathan

 

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

OLD STOGIES I HAVE FOUND…SHORT BUT NOT TOO BIG AROUND!

trailer

OLD STOGIES I HAVE FOUND…SHORT BUT NOT TOO BIG AROUND

Originally Published the Week of June 24, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

 

 

          I don’t know why Roger Miller’s classic lines in “King of the Road” always pop into my head at times like these.

         I am currently “hiding” on the closed 2nd floor of our Tailhunter Restaurant in La Paz trying to come up with something to write about. 

         To be honest, I’m looking out over the waterfront and late afternoon sunset over La Paz Bay.  My laptop is out and I just can’t think of anything.  Brain-dead syndrome.

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         But, I do have a cigar that I’m gently puffing on and a short 2 fingers of Pendleton whiskey to sip.  Perfect to dip the end of my cigar.

         I feel a bit guilty.  The blues and oranges of the sunset are looking like a Maxfield Parish sky.  I can smell grilled carne asada in the breeze from our restaurant kitchen downstairs seeking me out. 

         Except for not having a clue about what to write about, I’m enjoying this bit of solitude up here on the deck; watching the world go by and frankly feeling like I’m living large. 

         …and then there’s Roger Miller in my head too!

       I’m not a big cigar smoker.  Never cared for the things until just a few years ago.

       Good friends, Bart Hall (Fred Hall Fishing Shows) , John Pettey (Famous goldsmith) and the late great Jack Nilsen (Accurate Fishing Reels) invited me to an inner-sanctum tent at the Long Beach Fred Hall Fishing Show.

       After knowing these guys the better part of 30 years, I had never received an invite to “the tent.”  It’s kind of exclusive I heard.

        I told them I don’t like cigars and don’t know how to smoke them. 

       But, I was also told that I would only get “one invitation.”

       When 3 giants of the fishing industry invite you, it’s a good idea to go!

       Over several hours, I was “indoctrinated.”  Good stories and shots of whiskey, bourbon and wines helped seal the deal.

       That started it.

       If I’m lucky, I will enjoy maybe 2 cigars a month.  If I’m really lucky, I’ll get to puff a cigar more than half-way before the phone rings or folks show up or I have to attend to someone or something related to our restaurant or fishing business.

       I know smoking is bad for you. I”ve never smoked anything other than fish in my smoker.

        My wife, Jilly gets major props for stopping cold turkey on cigarettes when we first got married.

       But, I asked her if she minded me puffing a cigar now and then.  She said absolutely not.  It was one of the rare moments when she said that I stopped and slowed down for a few minutes.

       It truly is. 

       And frankly, she’ll stop by and take a draw on my cigar now and then herself.  I think she looks pretty good with a cigar in her hands.  It’s kind of a dangerous look.  Little rebel that she is.

       Lately, I’ve seen more and more guys coming down either with cigars or asking me where to get cigars.

       I’ll be honest, I’m not a cigar snob.  I’m also a cheap bastard.  Or, let’s just say I’m “economical.”

       Many decades ago, I was flying down here to Baja and a friend asked if I would buy a box of Cuban cigars for him.  I told him no problem.

       Until I went to actually purchase some Cubans.  Holy cow…I thought an entire box of Cubans would cost about $20 bucks!  They were $20 PER CIGAR!

       I came back with two cigars for him.

       I’m in the budget class.  Just like wine and tequila.  I know what I like and it doesn’t have to be the most expensive.  I”ll take a great cheeseburger over a terrible $40 steak any day of the week.

       There’s a lot of excellent things that don’t necessarily come from the top shelf.

        I cringe at the thought of paying a lot of money for a cigar I might only get to smoke for 5 minutes before I have to stamp it out because I get called away to do something.

       But a lot of guys ask me where they can buy Cubans. Or good cigars.

       I tell them if they’re just looking for a good cigar, many convenience stores in Mexico sell them from little cases. 

       They’re not Cubans.  Most likely Nicaragua or Dominican Republic tobacco, but if you’re just looking for something to puff on the beach at sunset with a cold beer or a sipping tequila or after dinner, they’re not bad.  And not expensive.

       On the other hand, if someone says they have “genuine” Cubans and they’re “almost free.”  You might want to pass.

       Surprise!  There’s a lot of phoney Cuban cigars being sold.  Just like that $25 Rolex watch or the “genuine” Gucci handbag deal. 

       C’mon man.

       Not being a gourmet cigar guy, I did a little research.

       Like anything else, you do get what you pay for.  No one will be selling you a genuine Cuban for 5 bucks. 

       If you know your prices ahead of time, you’ll know when a deal is too good to be true.

       The guys peddling cigars in little boxes on the marina are not Cubans.  Cubans are not packed in boxes with glass lids.

       It helps to know your packaging too. 

       A box of good cigars look alike because of quality control in the factory.

33425_Cohiba_Exquisitos_25S_sta_pac

       Check for labels and cigar bands.  The folks who make the real deal are as picky about their labels and seals as Mercedes and Polo.  They’re stuck to the product, not floating inside the box.

       I can guarantee you that the any seller who tells you he has a guy-who-knows-a-guy who works in the Cohiba or Montecristo factory back in Cuba…doesn’t know anyone. 

       He DOES know a sucker when he sees one.  Don’t be that guy.

       Take a look at the cigar itself.  One tell-tale sign is a cigar with different colored outter tobacco wrappers.  Called a “barber pole”. It’s a pretty good sign of a counterfeit .

       If you do happen to light up a Cuban, it should burn with a gray ash.  Somewhat of a salt-and-pepper appearance.  If the ash burns bright white, it’s a good sign you got a counterfeit stogie.

       None of these are sure-fire tell-tale signs.  Counterfeiters are very good. 

       But, counterfeit cigars aren’t necessarily bad either.  It doesn’t have to be Cuban to be good.  Just know what you’re buying.   

       And enjoy what you’re smoking. 

       I think I just wrote my column. 

20210411_153429

       “Trailer for sale or rent…”

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

FEELING A LITTLE MORE NORMAL AGAIN

SALUD!!!!

FEELING A LITTLE MORE NORMAL AGAIN

Originally Published the Week of May 17, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

The vibe just kinda just hit me this week.

         I had to go down to Cabo San Lucas which is about 100 miles south of us where we live in La Paz.  Had to take care of some business, but also check out the Cabo Airport.

         I got stuck in traffic.

         It’s been awhile since I’ve been stuck in traffic down here.  I mean, not just slo-mo movement.  I mean gridlock bumper-to-bumper stuff.  

         At the airport, to drop off folks, shuttle vans and taxis were triple-parked trying to let folks off at the curb.  Inside the terminal lines snaked back-and-forth and up-and down. 

        It was a morass of people struggling  to find their proper lines to check in for their flights as well as get their covid tests.

         Picking folks up, the same thing.  Chaos.  People ready and anticipating a cold margarita and sunny vacations now stuck in lines.  Buzz kill.

         Like being a kid getting taken finally to Disneyland then realizing it’s a 2 hour line to get on your favorite ride.

         From the time planes were landing, it was taking 1-2 hours for folks to get off the plane and get their luggage. Then, they had to navigate get through more snaking lines for immigration and finally customs and luggage x-rays.

         It was another hour wait to get a rental car…if you’re lucky.

         As my amigo and I sat in the car waiting for traffic, I looked at him and said, “I guess we’re back to normal.”  And went back to drumming my fingers on the steering wheel.

         And so it is.  I guess we’re somewhat back to normal.  At least it feels like it. The new normal?  Maybe so.

         There’s no doubt that Mexico, especially Baja, has become the #1 vacation target for Americans looking to get away…finally.  Covid or no covid.  Vaccine or no vaccine.

         Mexico is close. A quick little plane ride.

        There’s no quarantine.  It’s economical. It’s a long weekend.   

       To many the culture is not so unfamiliar.  It’s second nature to many Americans.    It’s not like going to France or Italy or somewhere in Asia.  And, getting back home is easy too.

         Although Baja still has restrictions, truthfully, they are almost un-noticeable.

         Sure, you still gotta wear a mask.  It’s a requirement, but it feels very relaxed.  No one is shaking a finger at you if you’re not wearing one. 

       And for sure, it’s rare that someone is going to remind the precious tourists with the American dollars to put on a mask.

           As you walk around, you’ll know if you need to pull up your mask. 

         You will still have folks taking your temperature at some places.  No big deal.

         Admittedly, restaurants and hotels are supposed to only be at 40-50% occupancy. 

         But, I see hotel parking lots are full.   Many restaurants are full and I sure don’t see many tables supposedly 6’ apart.  

          If the restrictions are being observed, it’s pretty loose.  Or maybe no one is really checking that hard.  Getting people working is too important. 

         Everyone is trying to make up for a devastating 2020, no doubt. 

         Those are just my own personal observations.   A generality, if you will. 

         But, honestly, it’s exciting to feel the nice buzz in the air.  A nice energy.  Visitors are excited to be here.

         Folks are excited to be working again. Locals are excited to have you.  Businesses have open arms waiting for you.

         Baja had it especially tough last year.  I remember everything being closed.  I remember night time curfews. 

         I remember only being allowed to have 2 persons in a car and everyone better have a mask on.  I remember having to sanitize your shoes and feet before entering a business.

       For Pete’sake, I remember when they cut off beer sales because brewing beer was a “non-essential activity.”  Long lines and small riots ensued at convenience stores. 

         Toilet paper no problem, but cutting off beer in Mexico?  That’s a real crisis.

         I don’t miss any of that.

        In an ironic bitter-sweet way, I will miss some things however.  Not that I ever want to go back to 2020.

        In a weird Twilight Zone kind of way, it was a peek at Mexico the way it was 30 or 40 years ago.    

         The ocean was empty and uncrowded. 

         The fish were ready and eager.  There had been so little traffic on the water. 

         I had the beaches to myself.  

         At restaurants the service was crazy good.  Waiters were falling all over themselves to wait on me.  Few tables were occupied.

         Hotels were almost giving away rooms to have you be there.  You got the pool all to yourself.  The jacuzzi didn’t have 20 kids diving in it.

         The swim up bar was just you and the bartender.   And he was anxious to have some company.

         And traffic?  What traffic?  Roads were empty.  The airport was empty. 

         Things moved at a much more leisurely pace. 

         I couldn’t wait for it all to end and it’s good to get back to some normalcy.  Good to see people back working and visitors flocking back.

         But, for awhile I got to see a different older Mexico.  Just for awhile. 

         It’s like those movies where someone invents a time machine and goes back in time.  Nice to visit, but you don’t wanna stay there too long!

         It’s good to be back to business.  Even if I’m stuck in traffic now and then.

That’s my story!

signature transparent JR 4-21

______________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

 

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

 

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

 

_____________

 

 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

 

Website:

 

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

 

 

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
 
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

 

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

 

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

 

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to think of all the things you never had the courage to try.” 

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MINE’S SO BIG

MINE’S SO BIG

Originally Published the Week of Jan. 20, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

 

Last week down here it was hard to believe it was the sunny Baja they project on all the tourism ads.

         Dang…It was 39 degrees one morning.  It was 36 degress another.  Frost on roofs and my car windshield.

         I found myself fumbling in our old ’92 Honda looking for the defroster and heater.  I had never used them and once I found them, I crossed my fingers hoping they worked. 

         Dust blew out, but thankfully, the heat came on.

         When it wasn’t cold it was windy.  Really windy.  And other days, it was both COLD and WINDY.

         It was just as well that we didn’t have anyone fishing.

         One later afternoon thankfully warmer than the morning, a group of local gringo fishermen came by our restaurant for some happy-hour beers and watch the sunset over the bay.

         I was able to sit a spell and join them.  As invariably happens with old fishermen like us, the talk turned to fishing.

         Smack talk and good laughs over some eyebrow raising tales and others that were genuinely interesting as the guys “alpha-dogged” each other with their stories.

         “The fish was the biggest…”

       “That trip was the best…” 

      “Well, let me tell you. You should have seen the time when I…

         I had a few of my own as well.  It’s a guy thing. You get the idea.  We are still the descendants of the hunter-gatherers who lived in caves and shared stories around the campfire.

         However, as the beer consumption increased and the sunlight diminished, the tenor of the stories changed. 

         More reflective.  More instrospective.  A different kind of bragging if you will.

         Guys would stare blankly at beer bottles and sotto voce talk about other deeper experiences.  It was almost like they were thinking out loud.  Almost more to themselves than their buddies.

asian-young-man-in-lonely-and-depressed-action-and-royalty-free-image-1026339258-1556566226

         There were pauses in the story-telling as they gathered thoughts or dredged up memories.  Or attempted to articulate how profoundly they had been affected.

         Think Captain Ahab, gripping his mug of grog… staring into the candle-flame… and talking about the “Great White Whale.”  The beast that not only eluded and endured his sharp harpoons, but turned the tables.

         It went on the attack smashing boats and fragile men into kindling and burning itself into Ahab’s tortured psyche.

         Or Hemingway’s old Santiago.  The old man who suddenly beholds an almost mythical fish on the end of his line and knows it’s the fish of his lifetime.

         “Man…I’ve never seen a fish do what this fish did…”

         “I couldn’t believe the power…”

         “I’m not sure what else I could have done.  Was it me?  Was it the gear?”

         “That was a fish that just wasn’t meant to be caught…”

         “We only got a glimpse of the fish and all of our mouths dropped…”

         I have never forgotten what Michael Jordan said about winning and losing. 

         To paraphrase, he said, “I’ve won many a game with a last second shot.  But, the ones I remember the most are the times my last-second shot missed. Those are the ones I never forget.  Those are the ones I lose sleep over.”

         If you fish long enough and fish enough, I think every fisherman has a fish or two they would like to have back.   It’s the fish that you wonder what you could have done differently.

         It might be decades old, but the memory is as vivid and as real as if it was yesterday.  And you will never have that moment again.

         It’s not like a fish ever comes back and says, “Let’s do two-outta-three!”

         If you haven’t fished much, you probably would never understand that connection. 

         You put bait on the line.  You put it in the water.  You get a bite.  You turn the handle of the reel and bring up the fish.  You take a picture.  What’s the big deal?

         In reality, we don’t catch every fish we hook. Fishing isn’t like that.

      Some get away and that’s the nature of the sport.  But every now and then, if you’re lucky, you hook that one fish you never forget and will always remember that it got away.

         And, in the end, fish come and go, but it’s the memories that stay with us.  And that’s really why we fish.  That’s what we have at the end of the day.

         Memories.

         It allows you to sit at the big boy table with no boring stories.  And a beer.

         And hopefully a sunset at the end of your fishing days.

     

That’s my story

 

Jonathan   

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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SAFE AS IT’s GONNA GET?

SAFE AS IT’S GONNA GET? 

Originally Published the Week of Nov. 3, 2020 in Western Outdoor Publications.

The Cabo San Lucas Marina…pretty much business as usual with boat traffic although foot traffic was relatively light.

_________________________

    Since the Covid Pandemic hit us last March in Baja, I’ve been been watching things pretty carefully.  I have to.  Being in the travel-activity industry, it’s pretty mandatory.

 

     In that time, I’ve watched us down here go from pretty much completely “RED” (complete stringent shutdown…harsher than the U.S.)…

     ….To “ORANGE” (open but with  strong mandatory restrictions still in place)..

     …..To “YELLOW” (open with a huge easing of restrictions) since September.

 

     Being in the “yellow” has been a huge economic breath for so many of us.  Restaurants, hotels and other businesses were allowed up to 50% occupancy.  Beaches and recreational areas were opened.  Churches, gyms, theaters and other “non-essential” businesses could finally open their doors.

 

     It has not quite been “business as normal” but it’s as close-to-it- as we have seen most of the year.  I think most of us down here have gotten used to it and we’re learning to live with it. 

 

     So many businesses didn’t survive.  The rest of us are just trying to stay afloat as well as possible.

 

     We would surely like to have thing completely open and in the “GREEN” level, but few of us think that’s going to happen anytime soon. 

 

     As with most governments around the world, the folks who make the decisions walk the tightrope trying to balance public safety against economic stagnation.

 

     Will we get to normal by 2021?  Short of some miracle vaccine or it’s equal, I kinda doubt it.  But, bigger brains than mine struggle with those issues.

 

     I will share with you that based on talking to our American clients that have visited us this year, most were surprised about their vacations.

 

     “I think it was safer than being back home in the U.S.  It surely was not any more dangerous” seemed to be the general consensus.

 

     As one of my fishermen told me who visited us twice this year, “I think there are so many safety protocols in place from the time I hit the airport; to the time I reach my hotel . . .hen while I’m in Mexico . . .hat I feel perfectly safe.  The tourist areas seem especially antiseptic with everyone very conscious about sanitation.”

 

     He’s already booked for next year.

 

     In fact, judging from reservations for 2021, it looks like a good year.  Covid or no Covid.

 

     Airlines are flying again.  In fact, several airlines have added or are in the process of adding more flights to Baja. 

 

     I know that for us in La Paz, for the first time in almost a decade, there will be direct flights from the U.S. starting in December. 

 

     I am also reading that some of the airlines are putting back that middle seat or from several flights that I have taken this year, there’s no more social distancing on the flights. They’ve been packed. Sold out.

 

     So, the airlines must be banking on the uptake in tourism to Baja.

 

     I think as an alternative destination, travelers will find Mexico overall a lot more attractive than Europe, Asia or other places which are experiencing another surge in Covid.  And many aren’t too keen to welcome Americans right now anyway.

 

     Pragmatically speaking, if there is a shutdown again, it’s a lot easier to get home from Baja than it is fromEngland or Italy, right? 

 

     My wife and I were supposed to be on a 3-week lifetime trip to South Africa right now.  In hindsight, South Africa would not have been a good place to be stuck.

 

     Even if you’re not flying, it’s not so hard to drive either.

 

     OK, I know there’s this “travel ban” on the border that has been in place for most of the year.  The governments of both Mexico and the U.S. have given no indication when (or if) it’s going to be removed.

 

     But, there’s several things to keep in mind.

 

     First, it does NOT apply to entering Mexico by flying, rail or water.

 

     Secondly, for all practical purposes, it seems to be more of a “suggestion” than an actual mandate.  I know plenty of folks who have driven right through the border without issue.  Some have driven several times. Some do it on a regular basis.

 

     In fact, that’s one of the complaints that has become devisive among the Mexican folks along the borders.

 

     Many decry the apparent “freeflow” of traffic from the U.S.  Keeping in mind the high Covid rates among Americans.

 

     But, there’s a huge contingency that wants and needs those tourism and business dollars that also flow into the country from Americans.

 

     So, it really just is-what-it-is.  That’s the bottom line.

 

     Mostly what I’m hearing from folks booking reservations next year is that Covid or no Covid, they’re coming.  Vaccine or no vaccine they’re coming. 

 

     For better or worse.  Most think it can’t be any worse than it is and frankly a lot of folks are just tired of having been kept home this last year.  Just my two centavos. 

 

     Vamos a ver…we’ll just have to see.

 

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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WHERE CAN I FIND “REAL” MEXICAN FOOD?

Originally Published the Week of Oct. 3, 2020 in Western Outdoor Publications

I think I was just asked about the 5th time this week by visitors some version of “Where can we get real-authentic Mexican food?”


Good question.  But, I have a hard time understanding how to respond.

I have to usually pause a minute before answering.

“What do you mean by ‘real authentic Mexican food?” I ask.

“You know, the usual food, but we figure that since we’re here visiting in Mexico, we can get the REAL stuff!” they’ll say anxiously.

Well, that doesn’t help me much. 

It would be like me visiting someplace like New York and asking, “Where can I get real ‘New York’ food!

Throw a question like that into a bunch of my  New Yorker friendsd and you’ll end up with as many different answers, arguments and debates as there are people in the crowd.

Mexico is probably a lot like New York gastronomically speaking.  Visitors come down with a certain culinary expectation.  And that could have been formed by eating at too many Taco Bells; neighborhood chain restaurants; or local neighborhood eateries.

Mexican food is as varied as the areas of the U.S.

Northern Mexico near the border has it’s regional specialties. Areas on Mexico’s East Coast have food far different from areas of Mexico’s Pacific coast or regions. Central and southern Mexico have their own specialties as well.

Even within those geographical vicinities, there are variables.  For instance, urban food will be different from rural areas.  Mountainous areas likewise have different food preparations than areas on the lower elevations.

So, when someone asks me where to go for real authentic Mexican food, it’s a tough answer.  In our area, I tell them if they’re looking for the kind of food they’re used to back home in the U.S., they probably won’t find it.

They are usually somewhat disappointed, but I tell them hit the streets.  Go eat at local eateries.  Not tourist spots.  Eat at street carts and small vendors.  Eat at places that you see a lot of locals eating and they can’t go wrong. 

Invariably, they end up loving their new discoveries.

Actually, instead of telling people what “real Mexican food” is, it’s often easier to tell them what is NOT real Mexican food.  It surprises many visitors.

For instance, if you’re looking for “pre-formed” taco shells like you find at fast food places back home, you’ll be disappointed.  Most tacos are served in soft hot tortillas you fold-around the hot filling.

The closest thing to a pre-formed taco might be “tacos dorados.”  Not named after the fish. It just refers to a deep-fried taco that is fried until “dorado” (golden).

You will not find ground beef in your Mexican food.

You will not find sour cream in your Mexican food.

To the surprise of many, you won’t find shredded cheese in your Mexican food or even any cheese at all.  Mexicans DO like hot melted cheese called “queso fundido” served as an appetizer very much like fondue.

By the way, Nachos were an American invention! Hard to have nachos if there’s no cheese around. Forget finding black olives too!

Fajitas?  Nope.  That hot skillet full of sizzling veggies and meat is a gringo concoction too!

Chili?  You’ll get a blank stare.

I once threw a party for a bunch of my friends many many years ago when I first arrived here in La Paz.  One of the items was “chili dogs.”

Who doesn’t like chili dogs?

Mexicans love their “hates.” (hotties).  But every single person at that party wiped the chili off their hot dogs then put them back in the bun.  I was mortified!

It was like watching someone pulling all the toppings off pizza and only eating the crust.  Are you kidding me? 

Chili’s origin is not Mexico.  It’s the U.S border areas and started as a stew you tossed meat, beans and spices into.

Who does not love those deep-fried chimichanga burritos?  We grew up on them at little league games; Tastee Freeze; and Mexican chain restaurants.

Well, that was an accident that happened at a gringo restaurant when the owner accidentally dropped a burrito into hot oil.  It was so good, he kept it on the menu and its popularity grew.

Speaking of burritos…guess what?  They didn’t  origiate in Mexico either. You WILL find burritos in Mexican cities (mostly in street restaurants or tourist areas), but historically, they had their genesis in California only about 60 years ago.

And the fillings? 

You’ll get shredded meats, grilled chunks of meat, but nothing that resembles what you’re used to. Again, no ground beef.   Most of our Mexican friends use ground beef to make…hamburgers…an unquestionable gringo concoction.

Two other little tidbits of non-Mexican origin:

Ask for a lime in your beer, and you’ve just labeled yourself as a tourist.  Locals don’t put a slice a lime in their beer.

The lime thing was something you squirted on the lip of your beer bottle or rubbed on the rim of your glass to keep flies away. 

Picked up by certain beer companies…the idea took wings.

Finally, what’s more synonymous with Mexico than a margarita?  Lots of places will lay claim to it’s invention, but most historians will point to it’s inception in California.  And interestingly, most locals I know don’t drink them.  They don’t even drink tequila.

We have had a restaurant in La Paz for over 12 years.  Most will prefer rum drinks or whiskey shots over tequila drinks.  They think gringos are crazy for drinking tequila!

By the way, that bottle of Tapatio hot sauce you’ll find everywhere?  Check the label.  It’s made in Southern California in Los Angeles!

That’s my story!

_____Jonathan_________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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THEY’RE MAKING IT TOO EASY!

Originally Published the Week of Sept. 16, 2020 in Western Outdoor Publicaitions

License plates say a lot about certain areas. 

Arizona’s plates proclaim the “Grand Canyon State.”Georgia’s plates tell you they have a lot peaches.

Minnesota wants you to know that they’ve got “10,000 lakes.” The “Corn State” is Iowa.  Easy one.

I’m not quite sure about South Carolina as “the iodine state?”  Hmmm…

Anyway, you get the gist.

Baja California’s license plate tells you it’s the “Frontera”. The Frontier.

Back in the day, almost 3 decades ago, when I first showed up down here in Baja, It surely was.  On my first trip diving down by myself, it was not without some trepidation.

Armed with Auto Club Maps, tour books, extra water, gasoline, engine hoses and belts, shovels and even extra toilet paper, I sallied forth across the border.  And there was no mistaking when you came across that threshold at Tijuana.

You were indeed, NOT in the U.S. any longer.

It looked different.  It felt different. Even the Mexican air felt different.

And when you finally broke out past the dusty concrete block buildings; tire shops; mom-and-pop taco stands and roadside vendors and into the open arid desert heading south, you were on an adventure. 

That desert went on for endless miles.  It still does.

Over the many years, it has continued to be an adventure.  And to live down here in those days, meant living on a much narrower margin of error than back in the U.S.

If you needed something, you didn’t just go down to the mall or Home Depot. If something broke, you fixed it or did without.

If you had to get from Point A to Point B, you had to ask yourself, how essential was it to get there?  Did you have enough gas?  Could you even buy gas? Did you even have transportation?  Many is the time I walked…and walked…and walked s’more!

Finding the simplest thing could take an entire day driving from place to place.

Everything had to be planned and calculated.

You actually had to plan meals way in advance. 

Running out’ve tomatoes or sugar wasn’t as simple as getting to the nearby grocery store.  Maybe you’re out’ve water.  Even more critical.

Even if you got there, there was no guarantee that they even had tomatoes or sugar…or water!

Things weren’t fixed by a simple phone call or checking the internet. There was no internet.  No cell phones.

You could wait days or weeks for the simplest of services.

Initially, this took some getting used to.  As Americans we’re used to having everything there at our fingertips. 

But, living in Mexico took some adjustment.  And for me, living out in the Mexican countryside made things double-hard…or at least incredibly inconvenient.  You just learned to get along without…or adapt. 

It could get frustrating.  At times, it could be precariously dangerous or urgent. It still is for a majority of folks down here.

We used to love it when a friend would travel back to the states. They carried lists of all the things that could be (dare-I-say) “smuggled back” down to Baja.

Please bring me music cassettes, a tool, a pair of shoes, some fishing line…Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue…American food!  Sausage…cheese…jerky…maple syrup…coffee!

Friends and clients used to actually bring famous In-N-Out hamburgers down to me from California.  They were cold and greasy, but what a treat!

I would hoard and eat by myself where no one could see me devilishly inhaling that cold burger like a little pack rat.  It was manna from heaven!

All of these things were the trade-off for being able to live by the ocean in a beautiful place.

That was living in the “frontera” of Baja.

Fast forward 2020.

Transportation?

A good number of my office staff arrive by Uber. Clients make their way around town or arrive at our restaurant by Uber.  Need to get somewhere?  It’s as easy as tapping out the app on your cellphone.

Three years ago, there were 8 Uber cars here in La Paz.  Now, it seems half the population is an Uber driver. 

You don’t have the ability to get bigger or smaller vehicles or share rides, but compared to transportation even 5 years ago, Uber is a no-brainer.  It’s just good solid transportation for a fraction of the cost.

 Locals don’t have to take crowded buses or walk.  Visitors don’t have to rent cars or take expensive taxis.

My own car is good for about 5 miles.  That’s it.  Then it overheats.  Uber has been the answer.

In fact, I don’t even need to spend/ waste a day hunting for many things anymore.

As I write this in my office, the delivery man just dropped off an Amazon box. 

Yes the magic “A” word! Danger! Danger!

Thank you.  Finally. Got that coffee bean grinder we “really” needed. 

Let me put it over there with the box that came yesterday with the special diet cat food for our rescue cat; wine bottle openers for our restaurant; and the new electric toothbrush.

All “essential” things!

The day before that, they even delivered on Sunday.  Got that cool set of patio lights; a new folding stepstool and even guitar strings!  Waited two-whole days for that delivery!

Yes, convenience has arrived.  And it’s been a game changer, even a life saver.

They’re making it too easy. And easy to get spoiled.

Progress and technology in Baja.  Living the dream!

Now, if only they could deliver one of those In-N-Out burgers hot!  Hopefully, another story for another time.

That’s my story!

Jonathan
Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter Sportfishing
www.tailhunter.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter Sportfishing8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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A PARALLEL UNIVERSE

A PARALLEL UNIVERSE?

Originally Published the Week of Aug. 18, 2020 in Western Outdoor Publications

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Have you ever found yourself during the day going through your usual routine and everything is just dandy?   But somewhere, somehow you feel something is not quit right.

Hmmm….

Did you leave the iron on or tthe water running back home?  Nope.

Forget to feed the dogs and cats?  Nope

Got your wallet and keys?  Check.

A birthday or anniversary or other event missed?  Nope

Underwear on right side out?  All good.

Just can’t put your finger on it.  But, you know something just isn’t co-pacetic.  There’s a slight disturbance in the force.

 

We’ve been up and running our fishing operation and small café and mini-market mostly for 2 months now here in La Paz.  Like everyone else, just trying to pull-it-together and hold-it-together after 4 months of strict quarantine.

Moving forward as as best as we can.  No other choice.

We’re thankful to be on our feet.  Moving slowly, but gratefully.  There’s a lot of our friends and neighbors who are not so lucky.  No jobs.  No money. Closed businesses.  Layoffs continuing.

We are allowed only 30% occupancy at hotels and restaurants as well as other places of business.   But frankly,  there’s not enough people around to come close to that.  Maybe 10-20% on a good day.

I guess, however, we’re settling into our groove.  We have clients and friends coming and going like usual.   They’re catching fish and doing the things they always do.

But after two months something is sorely amiss or missed.

We’re missing something here.

It wasn’t until about a week ago, it hit me.  I was saying good bye to some folks that  were headed out to the airport.   And I reailzed…in SIX DAYS… I hadn’t even seen their faces!  I had no idea what they looked like.

Conversely, they hadn’t seen mine either.

I’m not sure how to describe this.

When they arrive from the airport, they have their masks and go straight to their rooms.   I see them for about 5 minutes in the morning when we put them on the boats.

On the boats,  everyone is masked up.  The captains are wearing them.  The clients are wearing them.  It doesn’t do much for social interaction.  No one likes talking through a mask.

When they come to our restaurant, again, mask are on.  They take them off when they are eating, but because of social distancing, it’s not like the old days when I’d pull up a chair; have a beer and socialize.

Or I stand 6’ away and try to have some kinds of conversation.   It’s not very conducive to chatting.

So, after a number of days here, clients come.  They go.  And I’ve spent maybe 15 minutes total time with them.  Hello.  Now good-bye!

Hate to admit it, but with the safety protocols, it’s lonely and boring!  I understand the need for all of these things to be in place.  But they have made fishing and dining so anti-septically clinical,  that it’s truly taken the fun out’ve it.

Fishing was always a social event.  You get together with the guys or the family and you come fish and have a good time.  We chat and laugh and I get to see real smiles.

We don’t even shake hands, hug or high-five anymore. When they’re trying to show off-photos of their catch, be careful not to get too close.

I can’t help carry their luggage.  No one touches anything or immediately, you pull your gel out.

Even moving around town is different.

Have you ever been to Universal Studios where you’re walking down one of those movie-set city blocks?”   Everything in those movie cities and neighborhoods is perfect.

The people are perfect. Cars are perfect.  Everything is clean and spotless.   Everyone looks straight ahead. Got their masks on.  No eye contact.  No “Buenos dias.”  No waving hello.  No talking.

If anyone were smiling, you would never know it.

It’s just like they are all movie “extras” following a script and you’re just in the middle wondering what’s going on.

People here move from Point A to Point B and then they get off the street.

There’s no kids out.  There’s no teenagers out.  No families.

No laughter.  No smiles.  No joy.  No fun.

That’s what’s missing.

…and that’s my story.

signature June '18 two 1

Jonathan

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website: 
www.tailhunter-international.com

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