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Archive for the ‘seri indians’ Category

FIND YOUR BEACH (a novel approach)

15 MORE MINUTES PLEASE? OUR FOOD JUST ARRIVED!

FIND YOUR BEACH (A novel approach)

Originally Published the Week of May 12, 2022 in Western Outdoor Publications

This past week the last vestiges of covid-masking were removed here in Southern Baja.  Mask wearing in public places is now optional.

         Realistically, private businesses could still require masks to enter and employers can still require their employees to mask-up.  However, for the most part, we’re seeing the last remnants of “cobre boca” (face coverings) at least for now.

         During the pandemic, things were highly restrictive.  Much moreso than in the U.S. Especially during that first year in 2020, beaches were closed among many other things. 

         Once things started opening, beaches were open…closed…open… and closed depending on the whims of government to co-incide with the ebb and flow of covid infections.

         Understandably, whenever beaches were opened, the government advised folks headed there about social spacing.  Basically, asking folks to maintain their 3-6 foot distance from one group or family to the other. 

         Well, that went over like wings on a pig.

         After being cooped up for months, locals flooded to the beaches in droves.  Inspectors, police, health officials ran around trying to get people to space out.  That was like trying to empty a bucket of water with a sieve.  Wasn’t happening.

         A rule with no ability to enforce it is toothless.

         So, beaches got closed again.

         As covid ebbed, they tried something else. 

         Respective beaches were allowed an occupancy quota.  For example, one beach allows only 350 people.  That down the way beach gets 425.  The other beach is allowed 500.  And so on.

Tecolote Beach 10-21

         Once they hit a number, no one else was allowed in.  Even AFTER people left, no one was allowed in.

         Another exercise in futility.

         Authorities were out there actually trying to count heads on the sand.

         Let’s see…24, 25, 26…oh, your kids just ran into the water?  How many kids you got?  29, 30…

         Not an easy task.

         Back to the drawing board. 

         The next attempt placed security at the entrance to the beaches. They checked each car.  They counted the heads in each car. 

         Again, once the quote was reached, too bad for the rest of you.  Go home or go find another beach. 

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         That system actually got some traction.  Except not so much for the hundreds of folks that had been waiting in their cars in the Baja heat for a couple of hours with a carload of kids trying to get into the beach. 

         Then, being told, they were too late.  A lot of ticked off people.

         Sorry kids.  Sorry mom.

         Thousands of people want to escape to the beaches.  However, allowing only a limited number did work out so well.

         So, the latest venture attempts to remedy that. 

         And it’s being implemented in many places.  So far.

         It makes the beaches more accessible to more people.  Problem solved.

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         There’s just one catch.  Well, two actually.

         One is cost.  The other is time.

         Here’s how it works. They’re thinking about implementing this at many of the Baja beaches.

         You arrive at the entrance to the beach.  You are sold a bracelet to enter the beach.  Cost is less than 2 bucks.  That’s manageable.

         However…

         The bracelet allows you to stay in the beach for THREE HOURS.  That’s it.

Shifts are 8-11 a.m.  Then 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Finally 1-4 p.m.

         I’ll let you wrap your brain around that one.

         Apparently, at the end of each “shift”, they sound an alarm.  You gotta chug that last beer; fold up the umbrella and beach towels; grab the kids and scoot!

         If you want to stay longer, you need to purchase extra bracelets when you arrive at the beach. 

         I guess this will indeed allow more people access to the beach.  In theory.

         However, I’ve never been able to spend only 3 hours at the beach.  I don’t know many folks that have that ability.

         There’s one other glitch.  At some beaches, no charge to locals.  If you’re not local, you pay for the bracelet.  But that begs the question.  Are locals able to stay as long as they want?  And do they just grab a bunch of bracelets when they enter?

         Tourists need to pay AND scoot after 3 hours?

         Stand by.  I don’t think this is the last we’ve heard of this new plan.

 

That’s my story

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004. Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico http://www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront. If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi. It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________

 


Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address: Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA 91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report: http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g


“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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OUTSIDE YOUR EPI-CURIOUS COMFORT ZONE

A DIFFERENT SHOPPING EXPERIENCE

OUTSIDE YOUR EPI-CURIOUS COMFORT ZONE

Originally Published the Week of April 14, 2022 in Western Outdoor Publications

A few columns ago, I mentioned that a great place to get a bit of “real Mexico” is to visit the local church.  Get a bit of history. Culture.  Community.  Maybe even some healthy spiritualism thrown in.

But, I forgot maybe the best place to get a real slice of Mexican life.

Maybe it’s even more basic and more fundamental than going to church. 

I mean, admittedly, not everyone goes to church.  Plus, at church, we’re always seeing folks pretty much at their best.  Dressed up.  Respectful.  Attentive. 

For most of us, going to church is not an everyday activity. 

But, there is one place that pretty much everyone goes to eventually.  That includes, families, couples, kids…everyone!

Get away from the tourist zone and go visit a local grocery store.

I’m not talking about one of the numerous chain convenience stores on every corner that sell every manner of two things…beer and junk food.

I’m not talking about the new Walmart or Costco or Sam’s Club that seem to be popping up everywhere there’s a hefty gringo population or tourist destination.

I’m talking about a regular grocery store.

You’ll find one in pretty much any neighborhood. 

It could be an eye opener.

Sure, you’ll find a lot of products similar to the U.S., with growing demand for many of the same brands.  But, you’ll notice the prices are cheaper than the U.S.

For one, very often the quality isn’t quite the same as the U.S. even though the packaging might look the same.  You do get what you pay for.

You’ll find lots of canned goods.  Tons of salsas.  Many you’ve never heard of but worth a try!

mexican-supermarket-salsa

In produce, you’ll find some unusual thing like nopales (cactus paddles…the broad succulent leaves of the cactus plant).   You’ll see all kinds of chiles if you like to make your own salsa and you’ll notice that veggies like tomatoes and cucumbers, etc. are vibrant colors. 

That’s because they’re allowed to ripen in the warm Mexican sun not coated with wax to make them shiny.  And they taste so much better too1

Definitely you’ll see a lot of junk food. It’s a paradise of munchie food!

If it’s sugar or salt or something fried that you’re looking for, there is no shortage of soda, candies (some very interesting and unusual types you might want to give a taste) plus bags of bags of a zillion types of chips or other fried things.   

There are aisle and aisles of sugar and salt.   It’s unfortunately why diabetes is so rampant in Mexico.

In the meat section, there are  cuts you won’t recognize, other than to knowing it’s beef or pork.  However, Mexico cuts many of their meats differently than in the U.S.   Mexico has different names for their cuts. 

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Also, the cuts tend to be much much thinner (affordable) than in the U.S.  Unless, it’s a market frequented by gringos, you’ll never find a thick steak or a fat porkchop.  No ribeye, New York , T-bone or pork tenderloins!

You will find lots of different chorizo (pork sausages) and cold cuts in the deli section. 

You  will rarely have actual sliced ham for some reason.  Like the kind you put in sandwiches . It will be “ham flavored” but made from turkey (“jamon de pavo.”) and that includes packaged hot dogs.  You will however, find bacon, but in my experience, it’s incredibly salty unless you purchase an American brand.

The dairy section has lots of yoghurt, but tends to be highly sugared creamy syrup and you’ll have to look hard to find real butter.  Mostly it will be some type of margarine. 

You will, however, find loads of different and delicious Mexican cheeses.  It’s one of the true treasures if you get a chance to sample all the different cheeses including manchengo, queso Corazon, queso fresco and dozens more.

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Another great thing you ‘ll find in the larger grocery stores is a bakery.  Fresh cakes, breads, pastries are laid out and customers pick up a big flat pan and tongs and go up and down the shelves picking our their selections.  There will also be a section with fresh warm tortillas as well.

Getty-Bread-Case-588f4dca5f9b5874ee0b4108

However, the magic for me, is in the hot deli section!

The larger markets have hot dishes behind glass where you can buy incredible food to take home.  Carne asada…chicken mole…chicharrones in salsa verde…pork ribs…street corn slathered in lime and cotija cheese just to name a few of my favorites.

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Bring some of that home along with a cold Mexican Coke , some fresh warm tortillas and you’re good to go!

Give it a try next time.  They may not necessarily be the healthiest or what you’re used to, but it’s all pretty delicious  and you’re only ducking in for a sample! It can’t be any worse than ordering a pizza near your hotel or walking over to Burger King

Instead of the fancy tourist restaurant step away next time.  Ask your taxi driver where he does his grocery shopping and it’ll open up a whole new culinary world for you!

That’s my story!

Jonathan


Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004. Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico http://www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront. If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi. It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!


Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website:

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address: Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA 91942

Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report: http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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HI-FIVE and WELL DONE!

Some High-Fives are gratuitous and don’t mean much. There are other High-Fives that mean everything!

HIGH FIVE and WELL DONE!

Originally Published the Week of April 4, 2022 in Western Outdoor Publications

          Last week, my wife, Jill and I were in Denver. 

         We’ve been on the road 3 months doing the fishing and hunting expositions across the western U.S. promoting our fishing operation in La Paz as well as tourism in general to Baja. 

         Each week a different city.  A different show. 

         In our booth four or five days for 8-12 hours-at-a-time.  Meeting and greeting.  Shaking hands and socializing. 

         We’ve been doing it every January to March for almost 30 years.  It’s fun.  But, it can also be wearing. 

         Long hours driving. Different hotel rooms.  Too much fast food.  Packing and unpacking all the booth and gear.   Convention centers with thousands of people packed inside.

         So, we’re at our last show in Denver.  As often happens, rather than look for parking in a major downtown metro, it’s often easier to take Uber from our hotel to the respective convention center.

         Dial up Uber.  He’s on his way.  Meet out front on the sidewalk.

         It’s early.  We’re half-asleep, but we gotta get to the expo.  It’s show time.

         Our uber driver today is Haani. He has a white Toyota Camry. 

         He pulls up.  Good-looking pleasant young man.  Swarthy.  Cleanly dressed. He helps us with all our briefcases, backpacks and other things we need to drag to the show each day.

         We climb in. Bonus points, the car is spotless and he’s got some light jazz playing.  Nice music for the morning.

         We make the usual conversation. 

         Jill asks, “Are you having a busy day?”

         He says cheerfully, “I’ve been working all morning and usually work the whole day.  But, today, I have to take a break in the middle of the day.”

         “For lunch?” asks Jill.

         “No.  Not today!  Not for lunch. Today I have a special service to attend!” replies Haani.

         “A special service?”

         He smiles and turns around towards us in the backseat and says proudly, “Today I will become a naturalized American citizen!”

         A pause as Jill and I wrap our collective brains around that for a moment.

         “Oh my God!  That’s awesome!”

         “Congratulations!”

         “This is the best news of the day!”

         Jill and I are both yammering out loud at the same time from the backseat as we lean over towards him.

         We are spontaneously shaking his hand; playfully punching him in the shoulder and giving him high-fives from the backseat.  I’m shaking him by his neck.  It’s like he just shot the winning basket…scored the 4th quarter touchdown…touched all the bases in the World Series. 

         For indeed he has!

         He is laughing and trying to keep the car on the road!

         He is beaming and his proud smile fills the rearview mirror as he watches Jill and I bounce around his backseat pumping our fists in the air!

         Haani is from Afghanistan.  He has been working hard on getting his citizenship for six long years.  He says it is the hardest and best thing he has ever done.

         He and his wife work two jobs.  Two young kids in school.

         He tell us what a great country America is.  He could not be prouder.  Or more grateful.

         Neither could we.  He dropped us off and we all laughed and we wished him well with one last handshake and high-five.   It made our day.

         Welcome to America, Haani. 

         We’re gonna lift up a cold one to you and your spirit to luck and a better life!

family-celebrates-nationalization-with-american-flags

 

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

        

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YOU CAN’T GOOGLE or TRIP ADVISOR THIS

YOU CAN’T GOOGLE OR TRIP ADVISOR THIS

Originally Published the Week of Mar. 26, 2022 in Western Outdoor Publications

         Living in Baja, visitors often ask me some suggestions of where they can “see the real Mexico.”  They’re not interested in finding out where to go zip-lining or the cheapest place to buy a hammock or sarape.

         They want the genuine article.  The real deal.  Something not “touristy.”

         I tell them to head to church.  Preferably on a Sunday or a Saturday afternoon.

         After a momentary quizzical look, I explain that they’ll see a part of Mexico…a part of the community…a lot of history and a lot of culture if they make a visit to the local church.

         Every city or large town has a Catholic church. 

         Since the earliest days of the conquistadores and missionaries, you can pretty much find a Catholic Church somewhere in the area.  To this day, Mexico remains largely a Catholic country and the church is still the center of life…even if not everyone goes to church all the time. 

         Nevertheless, the church is still central to so much that goes on in a Mexican community.  Obviously, it’s a spiritual and religious center.

         Architecturally, it’s usually in the center of town or in a town square, park or pavilion area.

         Socially, it often remains the place where life’s milestones still take place.  Start to finish…baptism…confirmations…quincineras (sweet 16 presentations)…weddings…more baptisms…and funerals.

         So, I tell folks to head to the local church. 

         Outside, there are often street vendors in the larger cities.  It can be a hub of activity.

         Our own cathedral in La Paz is in the town square and adjacent to the town park.  There are often musicians playing.  Families picnicking.  Impromptu karaoke and bingo games.  Old men playing chess or checkers.

         Stand outside. 

         If it’s an old church, take in the architecture.  Admire the craftsmanship.  Many of these churches weren’t made with modern cranes, bulldozers and electric tools. 

         Old-fashioned human labor with hand tools.  Sweat equity for credits in heaven.  Pride in details that were meant to last for decades or centuries.

         Handmade brick and quarried stone transported maybe from many miles away with carts, wagons and mules.  In some cases, the very wooden beams inside the structure as well as the window glass was transported from Spain, not to mention statues and religious artifacts and furniture.

         The bells may have come from some faraway forge as well.  Most likely yes.

         If there’s an old cemetery nearby, well worth it to trace the history of the former priests, padres and parishioners.  It was a hard life. 

         You’ll often see short life spans.  Children and babies who died early.  Many deaths close in date could indicate a communal epidemic like measles, smallpox, dysentery or a simple flu.

         Step inside.  Remove your hat.  There might be a Mass or other event taking place.  Even if not, remember it’s still a house of worship.  Be respectful. 

         If nothing is happening, wander and gaze.  Statues, the alter, the stained glass, the wooden pews, paintings and artwork may date back decades or centuries.  They may have travelled thousands of miles to find their forever homes in this church.

         The craftsmen are long gone, but their work remains.  It’s better than any museum. 

         Imagine today, we go to Home Depot.  Get our materials.  Build a bookshelf for your home.   Never in a million years would we expect it to last for decades.  Not like these old artisans. 

         I’ve been in old Mexican churches where the walls and ceilings are still covered with the dark soot of a century or more of burning votive candles. 

         A close examination of the area around the alter shows inset graves of the old padres who once serviced their community.  The tiles show their names.

         It’s a testament to their dedication and commitment that many of them travelled from Spain or other places in Mexico to find their final resting place in the arid hard-scrabble frontier of Baja.

         If there are services taking place, many times, there can be multiple events transpiring since often, there’s only one priest or padre.  In some instances, the priest is a travel-priest doing services from town-to-town to tend to his parishioners.

         But, if you’re visiting, that’s where you’ll see the culture.

         I once came for Mass.  It was followed by a baptism.  Followed by a wedding.  Followed by a first communion of 8 and 9 year-old-kids in their little white shirts and puffy dresses.

         The whole gamut.  Proud families.  Happy couples.  Nervous youngsters.  Big days in life.  Big days in the community.  The circle of life.  The cycle of life.

         All in one place.  Just follow the sound of the bells!

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

 

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

 

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

 

_____________

 

 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

 

Website:

 

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

 

 

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
 
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

 

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

 

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

 

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

 

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IT’S OK TO BREATHE THIS AIR

IT’S OK TO BREATHE THIS AIR

Originally Published the Week of Dec. 13, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

Christmas time in Baja.

         Specifically, here in La Paz where we live and have our businesses.  

         On so many levels, the air is definitely different this year.  And, on so many levels, it’s easier to breathe.

         It’s palpable

         Practically speaking, masks are pretty much down.  Exhale.  Inhale.  Exhale again.  It’s been awhile. 

You can probably relate. Feels pretty good not to talk through a piece of cloth.  Or trying to figure out what you were saying to me!

I have a hard enough time understanding Spanish or trying to make sure my Spanish was correct.  Let alone trying to do it through a mask!

And hey!  That’s a smile under there.  I was tired of just looking at your eyes!

The pandemic hit Mexico especially hard.  It whacked Baja really hard, especially for an economy that depends so heavily on tourism.

Seventy percent of the population lives hand-to-mouth.  It’s a cash economy. No one is on anyone’s books. 

If you have a job, most get paid in cash or what you can sell.  Conversely you pay cash as well. 

Cash.  No checks.  No credit card.  No bank account .

What’s in your pocket at the end of the day is how you feed yourself and your family. And back home, that could be a lot of folks living in a small space.

No school.  No computers.  No Netflix.  Beaches closed.  Stores closed.  Restaurants closed.  Curfews enforced.  Entire areas completely off-limits.

Sit and stare at the rest of your family for days-on-end.

If you were actually on someone’s payroll and that business closed it’s doors during pandemic, that was just tough luck.

No feel-good stimulus checks.  No unemployment checks.  It doesn’t work like that in Mexico.

No money . No food . Simple as that.

Last Christmas, there wasn’t a lot of hoo-haaa. 

So much lingering uncertainty . Many places and events still closed.  Even churches were closed. 

Fast forward to Christmas 2021.

This year, most of Mexico is now in the green level.  It’s been a long transition from being in the red. 

In our city of La Paz, I’ve heard it’s got one of the highest levels of vaccination.  Something like 85% of the population has their shots.

Tourists are flocking to Mexico, in general, and Baja, in particular.  It’s a quick hop from the U.S.  No need to quarantine or prove you’re vaccinated to enter. 

The dollar is strong.  Mexico wants you.  Mexico needs you.  There are deals to be had.  The world is figuring out Mexico is a good value as well. 

The border is “officially” open now.  Technically, it’s been closed since early 2020 although it was easy enough to drive across.  But, it deterred many visitors from…well…visiting!

So, there’s a reason for optimism in the air.

You can just tell walking around town.

It’s good to see decorations and lights again.  It’s good to see people in the stores and restaurants. 

There are actually real live people hanging out on the beaches again.  Not just police shooing people away or giving out tickets.

Even Mexicans are travelling.  It’s OK this year to go see family and friends. 

The surest sign of hope and optimism…I saw a wedding and a baptism at our local cathedral. 

And that’s the difference.  There’s a subtle sense of joy in locals and visitors alike.  They’re enjoying themselves!   Not looking over their shoulders or over masks.

Yes, people are gathering. 

We may have this virus with us for a long time.  Things will probably never be like it was, but there’s an actual air of hope. 

You can feel it.  You can breathe it.

It probably makes the health officials cringe.  And government officials cautiously tippie-toe on eggshells hoping the other shoe doesn’t drop on the merriment or economy.

But, for now, it’s a good time to enjoy the smiles. 

A good time to appreciate the moment.  A time not to be taken for granted.  A time to appreciate each other again and how precious simple freedom is to each of us. 

It can be fleeting.  As we saw only a year ago.  Poof…gone!

I’m not talking about political freedom.

It’s even more basic. 

The simplicity of walking where we want to walk.  Taking a big unhindered breath.  Going where you want to go.   Shake a hand.  Give a hug.  Eat dinner with the family.

Hold a child.

This is the precious air you can gratefully breathe this Christmas. 

May it wrap and surround you and yours.

Revel in it. Amen.

 

That’s my story!  May you and yours be blessed this holidays and Christmas. 

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

WE HAVE A BLEEDER

WE HAVE A BLEEDER

Originally Published the Week of Oct. 24, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

In the several decades that I’ve been writing fishing articles and columns for magazines and newspapers, I don’t think I’ve ever tackled this subject.  I don’t know why.  Maybe it’s because it’s just something I don’t think about much.

         For what we do down here, it’s just not much of an issue. 

         However, it’s come up several times in the last few weeks with regards to our panga fleet here in La Paz.

         One was a legitimate question about bleeding your catch.

         Two of them were complaints of sorts from first-time anglers who had never fished in Mexico and had also never fished in a panga.

         Let me explain.

         The process if “bleeding” a fresh-caught fish can really be beneficial.  It’s not that difficult to do, especially after you’ve done it a time or two.

         It involves taking a catch just out’ve the water.  While the fish is still flapping, quickly cut to it’s heart and the main artery right behind the gills.  You let the heart pump out the blood.  Easy.

         All fish are a bit different, but you can Google up the specifics. 

         By, the way, I’m all for a quick dispatch of any catch.  The quicker you do any of this, the better for the fish rather than let it flip around in a fish box, bucket, ice chest or kill bag. 

         But, it can be messy.  I mean, “all-over-the-deck messy” especially for really dense muscled fish like a tuna or bonito for example.

         Therefore, if you can, let the blood pump out while holding the fish over the side, if possible and practical.  Or, hold it in or over your bait tank.  If you can’t do either of those, at least do it away from everyone else.

         And be prepared to clean off the deck rapidly. 

         Then, get the fish chilled on ice.

         The whole idea, as explained to me by a marine biologist many years ago is that when a fish, or anything dies, it immediately begins to decompose.  Makes sense.  No vital organs are working anymore.  Blood, nerves, brain function, etc. are all flat-lined. 

         Blood left in the fish is also  logically decomposing. 

         By getting rid of the blood, you can really help improve the flavor of the meat by leaving you with cleaner and better tasting fillets.

         That’s the theory.  And it works!

         The reality can sometimes be different which brings me back to the complaints I received this week.

         When I worked on big private charter boats, it was relatively easy to bleed-out a fish.  I was a deckhand. 

Or there were other deckhands.  Even if there was a lot of activity on the deck during a bite, usually someone could bleed fish.

         Unless it was really crazy.

         I’ve worked on party boats and multi-day charter boats and ultimately, you’re dealing with a lot of fishermen.  There’s simply too much happening.

         A bunch of folks are trying to catch fish.  Fish are biting.  Lines are all over the place.  It’s frantic.

         We’re tying hooks; gaffing fish; untangling lines; tossing bait; bagging and tagging fish…and more.  It’s full-speed turbo. 

         There’s hardly time to take one person’s fish and bleed it in the middle of the chaos.   It is what it is.

         On a panga like we have here in La Paz, sometimes it’s possible to bleed a lone solitary fish.  Sure. Let me get right to it.

         Here’s the dilemma.

         There’s one captain and there 2 or 3 anglers.

         The captain is the one-stop, driver; guide; deckhand and navigator. He’s got his hands full.   It’s kind of a small, efficient but ultimately croweded working platform.

         The fishermen are out there to catch fish.  The captain’s job is to facilitate that event.

         Bites can happen in a frenzy.  Two or three fishermen with bent rods and slinging fish in a small boat is fun and exciting and can be a blur of motion for the captain. However…

         If he stops to gaff, cut and bleed a fish…

         The whole process comes to a standstill.

         He can’t re-rig your lines or the lines of your buddies.

         He can’t be baiting hooks.

         He can’t be untangling your backlash.

         He can’t drive the boat.

         Your buddies might be pulling in fish at the same time.

         Or losing them.

         The fish school could disappear.

         It’s a pragmatic issue.  The anglers need to weigh taking the time to bleed solo fish versus all the other things that can happen in the interim.

         I think most would rather be catching fish than watching the school disappear.

         Simple as that!

That’s my story!

Joanthan


Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004. Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico http://www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront. If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi. It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!


Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website:

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address: Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA 91942

Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report: http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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CUTTING SOME SLACK

CUTTING SOME SLACK

Originally Published the Week of Aug. 11, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

          Current affairs here in Mexico…

         At one restaurant, we sat down to a dirty table. All the other tables weren’t much better. We had to ask the waitress to wipe the table and she looked put out by the request.

         At another restaurant, the waiter literally tossed the menus at us onto the table from about a foot away.  Turned and walked away.

         We’ve waited at other restaurants that we normally patronize and were left drumming our fingers on the table for meals that should not have taken THAT long.  I mean, how long does it take to make two plates of fish tacos?

         We’ve had clients tell us they went on some kind of booze cruise or some other kind of tour and find out it was delayed because “not enough crew members” or “they had to find another driver.” 

         We own several businesses here in Mexico and chatting with some other local business owners I guess we’ve got ourselves a labor shortage going on.  Sort of like in the U.S., but somewhat different.

         We thought it was just us. 

For our restaurant it’s been more difficult than usual.

Can’t find a cook.  Not enough waiters.  We’re down a driver…again.  The vegetable delivery guy quit again.  The bakery won’t be bringing burger buns for 4 days because they’re short-handed.

         We have advertisements all over social media, newspapers, school bulletin boards and other platforms.

         Maybe 20 apply.  15 say they’ll be there for an interview. 

        Maybe 5 show up.  Of those, we give 3 of them contracts. 

        Of the three…two of them actually show up for their first day of work.  

       One of the two never shows up. 

       One of the two quits after 2 days.  The other one doesn’t show up after 5 days.  No phone call.  No notice.  Just doesn’t show up.

      Or the universal excuse, “I have to quit because my mother is sick in Guadalajara.”  You have no idea how many times we’ve gotten something like this.   Everyone’s parent gets sick in Guadalajara.  Right up there with “My dog ate my homework.” 

     Other business owners are telling us the same thing.

     Can’t find people to work. 

     But, it’s a bit different than in the U.S. where folks find it more economic to sit on the couch with the remote because they’re getting unemployment checks or stimulus checks.

      Mexico doesn’t have that luxury.  There’s no enemployment down here.  Or stimulus checks.

       For many folks you work or you don’t eat.  So, why can’t we find workers?

      Some of our co-business owners with the same issues told me some of it is simply cultural. 

      “Like the rest of the world, some people just got used to staying at home. If you can ‘get by’ without working, there’s no need to go to work.”

      “Many people live together.  Especially younger people.  You find ‘youngsters’ in their 20’s and 30’s even with their own kids still living in the same house as mama and dad.  No one gets kicked out.  If mama will keep cooking and washing clothes, there is not much motivation to leave the house.  They are spoiled,” is what one business owner said to me disdainfully.

      “Some are just looking for the ‘perfect’ job.  They have no particular skill or education, but if a job isn’t ‘perfect’ they do not stay and bounce from one menial job to the other.” 

     One of my amigos agreed, “Yes, if it seems too much like ‘work,’ they quit!”

     By no means does this mean everyone has this work ethic.  There are many many good hard workers to be found.

     But, they are hard to come by .

     Or they in such demand, they get snatched up having their pick of positions.  And can also command higher pay.

     However, with the pandemic rules changing weekly combined with the shortage of workers, service is inconsistent.

     For example, the covid rules might say you’re allowed only 30% occupancy at a restaurant or hotel. 

     Keep in mind that you lost most of your staff last year when everything shut down so you’ve got almost a completely different staff. 

      Last year’s staff  that you had for years. has moved on.

         Then, they allow you to increase to 40% occupancy.  You optimistically hire and train more people.  

       You teach them how to cook; wait tables; clean rooms; work at reception; drive shuttles…and with a smile!

     Two weeks later, the government knocks everyone back to 30% occupancy. 

         Or, you you are not sell alcohol after 5 p.m.  Or the beaches get closed again.

         That pretty much kills all your evening dinner business.  You have empty tables.  You have empty hotel rooms.  People cancel reservations and trips.

         So, now you have to fire all the new people you just hired and trained.

         Then, the restrictions change again.

         And you just need bodies to work.  Whoever you can get.  Whoever is willing to work. 

        No real time to train properly.  And no one knows how long that person will be working for you either voluntarily or involuntarily.

         So, the guy making tacos, is still learning to fry a tortilla.  He can’t remember if the fish plate gets beans on the side or rice.  Or has never heard of meat “medium rare.”  Cooked mean cooking until it’s done.

         The guy making your margarita has never worked in a bar before.  He thinks a margarita is tequila mixed with orange juice.

         They waitress tells you she’s not sure what’s on the menu.  She has actually been fired or quit her last 3 restaurant jobs.  But, the restaurant owner was desperate to hire someone

         The guy driving your shuttle tosses your luggage in the back and gets lost driving to your hotel.  Takes 20 frustrating minutes to go 4 blocks.

         That’s not to say they’re not trying.  Under the circumstances.  Seems like most of them are. 

         Everyone is just trying to get by.  I have to remember to cut folks some slack and remember it’s not just us.  Or us. 

         “Dog ate my homework and my mother is sick in Guadalajara.”

         It’s just the times we live in now.

 

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

AM I MISSING SOMETHING?

Originally Published the Week of July 18, 2021 in Western Outdoor Publications

AM I MISSING SOMETHING?

         I was sitting in our restaurant the other day here in La Paz.  It’s kind of a big multi-story eatery over-looking the waterfront.  Sometimes, it’s nice to bring my laptop upstairs to work.

         I get some fresh breezes and sunshine. I get to people-watch all the goings-on downstairs on the beach.  And I get to visit with folks a bit too.

         It’s also difficult avoiding a bit of eaves-dropping and observing.

         So, there’s one table over there with a family of five.  Mom and dad.  Three kids.  Two girls and one boy.  Maybe ranging from 12 (the girl) to 9 (the  youngest boy).

         No one is talking.  At least not what I would call talking.

         All of them, mom and dad included, are all on their cellphones.  Tapping.

         I think some of them are actually communicating with each other via text on their phones rather than just looking up and saying something to the other family member.

         The only conversation I hear is a comment about what they are reading, but loud enough for the rest of the table to hear…and comment.  If anyone else is interested.

         Random comments just thrown out there like playing cards on the table…

         “I simply CANNOT believe it, Shelly broke up with Lance over the phone.”

         “Did you see where Danny and Elaine are finally engaged?”

         “Wait, hold on, I’m streaming the NBA finals and the Bucks are down by two”

         Even when the food arrived or when one of my servers asked them something, there was merely a perfunctory one or two-word response before getting back to whatever was no that tiny screen.

         Tap…tap…tap…thumbs flying.  Somehow mastered the ability to eat and type at the same time.

         But who am I to judge, right?   There musta been some really important critical communication going on at that table.  (“Joes’ family gets to go to Hawaii next month!” “Our neighbors got a new dog!” )

         There was another family next to them.

         Family of four.  One girl.  One boy. 

        Ages 10-12…maybe. Honest.  Hard to tell. 

       She kinda dressed like a boy…torn jeans…cropped hair…baseball hat.  He was dressed in lanky stovepipe pants that were pastel-colored with and hot pink t-shirt.

       Mom and dad were very nice and conversant when I visited the table to make sure everything was OK.

         Kids…hmmmm…

         Never took their sunglasses off.  Oozing attitude.  Bored. Disaffected.

         “Why are we here when we could be somewhere else?” unsaid behind the smirks.

         One of the boys said, “Can you turn down the music?  It bothers me.”

       Said what he said and I was “dismissed” to go turn down the Jimmy Buffet music I had in the background. 

       No “please” or “thank you.”

        Yessireee…right on it, young master.

         Parents not affected by the attitude.

         They had a hard time finding something on the menu for the boys.

         “Are your chicken wings as good as Buffalo Wild Wings? That’s our favorite and that’s the only place we eat them. “

         “Do you have more things on the menu to choose from?  Mostly, you have Mexican food and I don’t like tortillas.  Or cheese.  Or beans.”

         They eventually ordered plain hot dogs on buns and had two orange soda floats each and pretty much ate in silence.  Like they couldn’t wait to get out and why’d mom and and dad drag us out here? 

Sunglasses never came off.  One kid never took his ear plugs outta his ears.

         Down the other end.  Dad and two boys.  Young teens.  I wasn’t quite sure if both were his sons, but it might have been a son with a chum along on the trip.

         I got the impression this was an absentee dad.  Maybe a divorce?  Out to take his son out on a trip.  Some bonding time.

         I heard him talking to them about maybe some beach time.  How about a snorkel trip to swim with the sealions?   Or maybe do some fishing or kayaking!

         Hot dang!  We’ll have a great time, boys!  What d’ya say?

         He was really excited and trying hard to sell the activities.

         The boys…pasty-white complexions that never go outside…and stylishly-gelled hair…

         Wanted to know where they could get massages and a manicure and pedicure.  And if the hotel had NETFLIX.

         Dad was a bit crestfallen.  Understandably.

         Am I missing something?   I had to ask myself.  What’s going on?

         This kinda stuff is not uncommon from what I see…almost daily.

         I don’t think I’m missing anything.

         I think THEY are missing something.  The kids AND the parents.  On so many levels.

         I wanted them to get excited about the view of the ocean or the sunset or even an “OOOooo”and “Ahhhh…” over a dumb plate of nachos.   Or the anticipation of jumping in the water or going fishing.

         But no.

         Yea…there’s a lot missing these days.

         Maybe it’s just me.  I’m old and old school.  Not hip enough.

         My wife Jill says I’m “outdated” because I still use e-mail and all our grown kids use Instagram and Tik Tok and Twitter and Whatsapp and…and…and..

         Can’t keep up with all those social platforms.  I miss plain conversation with my own family.  Obviously, these families don’t miss it at all.

         Yup!  Life has just passed me by. But, I haven’t missed much. Just eavesdropping and watching the tables.  

         And taking it all in.  And thinking with a smirk of my own.

That’s my story!

Jonathan

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Phones: 
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBLvdHL_p4-OAu3HfiVzW0g

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

TRAVEL TO MEXICO SOARS…Planes not so much!

          Mexico has become the go-to place for Americans as things open up.   It’s an easy get-away.  It’s economical.  It’s easy to get home.

         More Americans are choosing Mexico over the rest of the Covid-recovering world.

         Travel to Mexico is booming in all the usual places.  Cancun, Puerta Vallarta. Cozumel.  Cabo San Lucas. 

         It might not be back to where it was pre-2020, but it’s surely trending that way.  There are reports that flight travel, in general, is just about where it used to be.

         Just one problem.

         The airlines weren’t quite ready for it to boom back this much or this fast.

         Therefore, just as summer travel is hitting it’s stride, travelers are finding there’s some disconcerting hurdles to straddle

         Frankly, flights are getting delayed, changed and canceled with regularity.  Most recently American Airlines, Southwest and others have been cancelling over 100 flights per day. This does not begin to count the flights that are changed, delayed or re-routed.

         Insofar as my wife and I have dozens of clients per week flying here to La Paz to fish with our fleet, I would venture to say that at least 30% have had their flights changed…often several times from the original…and sometimes at the last minute.

         Maybe 40% have delayed flights where they either had unexpected waits at the airport or while sitting on the plane.

         Perhaps 10% have had their flights outright cancel.  Arriving a day or two later than planned, this has created issues with losing hotel nights as well as activities such as fishing. 

         If a replacement flight can even be found.  With many flights full, it’s not always a possibility.  Also, not all airlines fly every day.

         Going home to the U.S. has sometimes been an issue as well, although usually not as much.

         A big problem has been with connecting flights.  If one connecting flight is cancelled or extensively delayed, then there is no way for a passenger to make their next flight in a timely fashion.

         To some degree, the airlines point to the spat of bad weather that has hit the U.S. since the beginning of the year.

         However, not withstanding Mother Nature’s capricious whims, the bigger problem is a result of Covid.

         Many airlines layed-off thousands of employees last year.  Many employees were encouraged to accept retirement packages.

         Now with travel zooming back, like many industries, there’s a shortage of employees.

         Running an airlines is a little more complicated than teaching someone to flip burgers.

         One doesn’t suddenly find or train flight attendants in the classified section.  You can’t train a jet pilot overnight.  Aircraft mechanics and maintenance personnel don’t attend a 1 week night-class to get certified.  Ground crews can’t be found on Craig’s List.

         So, it’s just one more thing to keep an eye out for.

         There are several things you can do.

         For one, don’t assume the airline is going to tell you about changes.  Seems kinda logical and good business, but that’s not always the case.

I’ve had several clients who were never informed of changes until THE DAY of TRAVEL.

         I’ve had several others who never found out until they were AT THE AIRPORT.

         One was told, “Well…we’re sorry.  We tried to call you yesterday and also sent an e-mail, but no one answered.”  That’s right up there with “The check is in the mail.”

         Do yourself a favor and check…constantly!  Especially as the trip gets closer, don’t be the person who turns off their e-mails and instant messages the last day they leave the office.  Be pro-active and avoid surprises.

         Be prepared for the possibility of delay. 

         Bring a book.  Bring your medications.  Bring a jacket.  If there’s a bunch of delays and your flight isn’t until the next day, just assume that any nearby hotel will be full or just not worth the hassle. 

So, figure out what you’re gonna do for a few hours sitting in an airport chair or in the restaurant or bar.

         One of those goofy neck pillows isn’t a bad idea.  Even if you’re not having to spend time in the airport, if you’re stuck sitting on the tarmac in your plane for an extra hour or two, you’ll be grateful you had a neck pillow.

         The biggest thing to do is something I have advocated for years. 

         It’s trip insurance.  Google it up . There’s a zillion different companies and plans that will very economically insure pretty much anything on your vacation to missed flights; to missed kayak trips; to lost hotel nights or other plans .

         A week has not gone by lately where I was not assisting one of our clients help file a claim for compensation because of an airline SNAFU. 

         Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. 

That’s my story!

Jonathan

 

______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter.com.

They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________




Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website:

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942


Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

Read Full Post »

STAY FOR DINNER! SPANISH FOOD ON THE MENU!

 

Stay for Dinner!  We Have Spanish Food on the Menu! 

Originally Published the Week of April 10, 2018 in Western Outdoor Publications

A couple of columns back I had written about some history I found in an old book detailing the issues the Spanish had in colonizing the area around La Paz where we live.  Getting the especially belligerent tribes to submit took more than a century longer than other areas of Baja.

 

In that particular report, I had written how the tribesman had “gifted” the Spanish loaves of papaya bread.  It was nothing  like your Aunt Mary gives you for Christmas.

 

The papaya was made from crushed papaya seeds AFTER the tribes had eaten the seeds;  digested them; gathered up the droppings;  THEN baked them up for the conquistadores and padres.  Initially the naïve colonists accepted and ate them with glee.

 

Well…then, the masters found out!  Gag!  Choke! Spit!

 

Remember those Cub Scout cupcake sales as a kid?  Ex-laxing those confections?

 

Well…Whether it was a genuine gift or simply the Indians pranking the Spaniards we’ll never know.  The Europeans’ taste buds and culinary sensibilities were not amused in the slightest.  They retaliated with violence against those dastardly locals.  Complete buzz kill.

 

Recently, I again found myself pouring over some old Baja books in my collection.  One was copy of  the book written by my venerable predecessor at Western Outdoor News, Ray Cannon.  You never know when a gem might pop up.

 

His 1966 book published by Sunset entitled “The Sea of Cortez” is required reading for any Baja aficionado.  If you can get your hands on a copy it’s what Genesis is to the Bible for Baja fans.

 

Just looking at the black and white photos will give you a sense of what Baja was before it was really discovered.  Indeed, many a Baja fan got their fires first kindled reading Ray Cannon’s book as well as his historic columns in Western Outdoor News.

 

Regretfully, I ashamedly have never read the entire edition, but I keep it handy in my library and it’s one of those books I pull down from time-to-time and always find a treasure.

 

Like my previous article  food comes into focus.  But, in a different way this time.

 

One of Ray’s chapters is about the Midriff Islands appropriately located about half-way down the Sea of Cortez.  It’s the narrowest part of the Sea and “Midriff” somewhat describes how the ocean is pinched like a woman’s waist in that area.  The Midriff Islands somewhat form irregular stepping stones between the Baja Peninsula and the mainland of Mexico.

 

On the far eastern edge lies the large island of Tiburon aka “Shark Island.”  It sounds like the name of another reality show.  It’s the largest island in the Sea of Cortez and encapsulates about 450 square miles.

 

Cannon described his earliest visit to the island then inhabited by the nomadic Seri Indians.  They put to shore in a small skiff off their larger vessel. Cannon remembers as they neared shore about a dozen fierce men and women ran out to meet them.  The were brandishing “deadly looking shark spears.”  Ray and his companions quickly reversed course and paddled back.

 

It was later he was told by his Mexican crew why they did not want to accompany Cannon to visit the island.

 

Apparently, people had been disappearing on mysterious “Shark Island” for centuries.   And “not just into thin air” as Cannon recounted.  They disappeared into the soup pot.  Or staked to the barbecue.

 

This included sailors, explorers, gold miners and others.  Never heard from again although bits of pieces of people had been recovered over the years.

 

The Seri Indians never admitted it.  Who me?  Nah!  Must be some other guys.  Would never do that!  Never saw the gringos you’re looking for.

 

But…The Spanish explorers had kept logs of it.  Dating back to the Spanish days, shipwrecked sailors had washed up and found refuge on Tiburon’s rocky shores.

 

The forlorn sailors were grateful to be taken in kindly by the Seri inhabitants.  They were treated and fed well.  Like one of the family. They got fat and sassy.  Living the dream on an island!

 

Until it came time for the big fiesta and finding out the Seri tribespeople were really into Spanish food.  In fact, Spanish dishes were the main course.

 

Over the years, more mysterious “disappearances” fed the stories.

 

History reports that up until the late 50’s the Mexican government allowed the Seri to remain on Tuburon Island. By this time, the tribe, once estimated as large as 5,000 had been reduced to a handful by the usual culprits.   Most notably, they fell victim to European disease.

 

The government had one caveat.  No more cannibalism.   Change your diet! Find a different source of protein.

 

Then some Mexican fishermen went missing.

 

This caused the government to ship the whole tribe of several hundred to the Mainland.

 

Today, the Tiburon Island is operated as a wildlife refuge and very few Seri remain where they are known for artistic basket weaving and those dark ironwood sculptures.

That’s my story!

Jonathan signature

Jonathan

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Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

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Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International


Website: 

www.tailhunter-international.com

Mexico Office: Tailhunter International, 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico


U.S. Mailing Address:  Tailhunter International, 8030 La Mesa Blvd. #178, La Mesa CA  91942
 

Phones: 
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863
.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:  http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Video Channel:

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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