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WEATHER or NOT?

windy-trees

WEATHER or NOT?

Originally Published the Week of June 6, 2017 in Western Outdoor News

For the last few months or so…well…actually since winter…I’ve been whining about the crazy windy conditions in all my fishing reports.  As many of you in the U.S. may have noticed, winter is being a tenacious boob about going away.

 

Memorial Weekend has come and gone.  I’m still hearing from amigos north of the border about abrupt snowstorms;  unexpected hail; crazy winds; and rain.  Folks are  uncovering their swimming pools; getting ready to mow lawns; pulling out the barbecue…and  winter sweeps in with an 11th-hour punch.

 

Even, in Mexico City, they had historic hailstorms causing damage!

 

Well, it’s been the same down here in Baja.

 

We SHOULD be into balmy hot sunny weather about now.  I should be hearing from fishing clients laughing asking for “a little breeze” to knock back some of the heat.

 

Instead, we get sporadic windstorms that kick up the ocean.  They muss up my water.  They scatter the bait.  They get people seasick.  They gum up the fishing!

 

So, I bitch. And I whine.  And I rail about “the wind.”

 

In fact, as I write this column at about 4 a.m. in the morning, the winds outside are howling and I can hear it rattling my windows.  I can hear waves crashing outside and the palm trees are somewhere out there in the dark being rudely rustled by a strong northwind.

 

And I’m dreading putting out my fishermen in about an hour.  The forecast says the winds will calm down, but I know they’re gonna get wet.  And bounced.  And uncomfortable.  And that’s not what I want.   It sure doesn’t look like the fancy brochures right now!

 

But, last time I checked, I didn’t have a “weather control” button.  Dangit!

Anyway, a good friend asked me a great question that I don’t think I’ve ever been asked before.

 

“When is it too windy to fish?”

 

Relatively speaking, that’s an easy answer.

 

Like asking “When are the waves too big?  Or “When is it raining too hard?”  Or not.  You walk outside.  You figure it out pretty fast.   Yes or no.  You then decide to go. Or not.

 

But, if you’re like me, you want to play the odds a little better than just looking out the window or showing up at the docks.  This is especially true this year whether you’re going to Baja or anywhere else for that matter.

 

Since our livelihood down here with our fishing fleet depends on putting our customers on fish, I look at several variables.  Internet weather and wind sites are invaluable.  I use several to get the best picture of the coming forcast.

 

I look at:

 

  1. Windspeed
  2. Time
  3. Direction

 

Obviously, with regard to windspeed, I want it to be as calm as possible.  If the windsurfing and kiteboarding crowd starts to gather on the beach, something is up!   I want to know if the winds will be single or double digit speeds.

 

If you’re going to be panga fishing, then double-digit winds could be problematic.  If you’re going to fish inshore, maybe it will be OK.  If offshore, you might want to re-think things.  If you’re headed out in a 50-foot sportfisher, probably not so much.

 

The second variable I check is time.  When will the wind be blowing?  If it’s going to be blowing in the early morning and calm down later in the day,  that’s not too bad.

 

If the forecast calls for double-digit winds, but during the fishing hours, it settles down then, I really don’t care.  Let the wind blow all it wants when I’m back at the hotel hitting happy hour after a good day of fishing!

 

The third thing I take into consideration is the direction of the wind.  If it’s going to be blowing harder than I would like;  if it’s also going to blow during the hours I want to fish; then I want to know where the wind is blowing.

 

If the winds are coming full-speed out of the north and I’m going to be heading north to the fishing grounds early in the morning, then I know it might be a long bumpy wet ride.

 

If we’re heading south and the winds are coming from the north, then it would mean the wind is at our backs.  It’s going to push us along very nicely to where we want to go.  (Although coming back might be an issue if the wind is still blowing.)

 

By the same reasoning, if those north winds are going to kick up and we’re going west or east, then it might create some swells and rollers as the boat goes side-to-side.  You might want to be sure everyone has their seasick pills that morning and stays away from the greasy breakfast burritos!

That’s my story!

Jonathan signature

Jonathan

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Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is: jonathan@tailhunter.com

Or drop by the restaurant to say hi.  It’s right on the La Paz waterfront!

_____________ 

 
Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International
 
TAILHUNTER FISHING FLEET #1 Rated on Trip Advisor
TAILHUNTER RESTAURANT BAR Top 5 – Rated in La Paz on Trip Advisor
 
Now follow us on FACEBOOK TOO

 

U.S. Office: 8030 La Mesa, Suite #178, La Mesa CA  91942
Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-53311
.
Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:
http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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YES YOU CAN…MAYBE

beach shack

LIVING THE DREAM? IT IS POSSIBLE!

YES YOU CAN…MAYBE!

Originally Published the Week of March 3, 2015 in Western Outdoor News 

Admit it. At least once…probably more than once…maybe even several times today, you said to yourself, “I’m gonna blow this place and just move to Mexico!”

 

Or, you’ve entertained thoughts of simply leaving no trail and vanishing into the Baja to put your toes in the sand; a cold one in your hand and create your own Corona Beer commercial. C’mon. You know you have!

 

The grass is always greener on the other side. Heck, I’ve lived in Baja almost 20 years and there’s times when even I get fed up and say, “I’m done with this. I want In-N-Out burgers; push-button convenience; and roads that don’t puncture my tires and wreck my suspension.”

 

But seriously, Baja is high on the “leave-it-all-behind” list. In fact as a whole, Mexico is the #1 vacation and retirement destination for Americans. Some have a plan. Some don’t. Some just wing it.

 

I once met a guy. He was in construction and got crushed in the latest economic fubar a few years back. Frustrated with trying to stay ahead of the game. Decided he’d had it and was going to make his own game.

 

Sold what was left of his business. Bought a big RV and tied his boat to the back of it. Strapped his surfboards on the roof and came south. No forwarding address.

 

Last I heard, he was living on the beach south of La Paz on the Pacific side. I won’t tell you where. He actually had a girlfriend come looking for him once who looked me up hoping to locate him. It wasn’t like I had an address or he had a phone.

 

He had built a little palapa over his RV. He was teaching surfing lessons. He had built a little public shower out’ve old pallets and bamboo and PVC tubes. Fifty cents for 10 minutes of hot water. Discounts on shower time if brought him a 6 pack of beer!

 

There was another guy many years ago. His family came down looking for him. His wife had passed. His kids were grown and off doing their own thing. He hadn’t had much contact with them.   His exit was a little more dramatic.

 

All he said was, “I’m driving to Baja.” His family didn’t think much of it. He was retired and was a travelling kind of guy. But, as a former executive, he at least kept in touch with folks.

 

After five weeks, no one had heard from him.

 

They came into La Paz putting up “HAVE YOU SEEN THIS MAN?” posters everywhere.   It had a fuzzy black and white photo of a smiling guy on an ATV named “Bradley” from Phoenix.

 

They had been up and down the Baja hanging posters searching for him. As I watched them put one up in front of our offices, I could see the angst, frustration and fatigue.   They told me the story. All I could say was that I’d keep my eye out.

 

Several days later, I happened to be out on the sidewalk and saw a tall scruffy bearded guy in cargo shorts and sandals looking intently at the photo. He saw me looking. He looked back and smiled. I raised an eyebrow at him. You?

 

He raised a knowing-eyebrow back.   Looked back at the faded flyer. Smiled a crooked smile and kept on walking. Hmmm….

 

Similarly, I’ve run into others who only go “by first name only please!” Or have openly told me they don’t want their photos taken or “I haven’t used my real name in years, and I like it that way.”

 

Usually said with a laugh. But, they are serious.   They have disappeared into the “frontera” (frontier) of the Baja.

 

Some folks just don’t want to be found. They have their reasons. Some are being chased…family, wife, kids, the IRS. Or not. Others come to chase something else. A vision. A dream. Themselves. Everyone has demons and angels.

 

I haven’t quite figured out my own motivations for 20 years in Baja myself.  I’m still working on it!

 

The stories can continue. Yes, it can be done.  And many do it.

 

But, most aren’t quite so dramatic or abrupt.

 

But, before you put out the “closed” sign on your business; bid adios to the U.S.A. and just sail, drive or surf into the Baja sunset, think first.

 

Don’t crack that beer just yet without some due diligence and a well-thought out exit strategy.

 

I guess the most important thing. Figure out how you’re gonna eat. As good as beans, tortillas and cerveza were on your vacation, it gets old after awhile. And dorado fillets don’t just jump into your refrigerator.

 

If you’re not bringing a coffee can full of cash, then it would be a good idea to figure out a source of income.

 

That means Mexican bank accounts and well, perhaps all the things you were trying to get away from in the first place.  Because, you need documents, documents, documents…starting with a passport…immigration forms…and that’s just to start.

 

If you hated bureaucracy (bureau-CRAZY) in the states, just wait until you get a taste of the Mexican version which is even doubly-mind-boggling, if you’re a gringo.

 

So, much for disappearing because now you’re back “in the system. “ And then there might be taxes to pay. So, you hate the IRS? You may have to now pay taxes in TWO countries.

 

And don’t forget if you start buying things, like land; a home; a car (with driver’s license of course!) and other things.  You’re leaving a trail.

 

So many have the impression that it’s “looser” in Mexico, but like anywhere else, there’s criminal laws, labor laws, civil laws; property laws, immigration laws etc.   And like anywhere else you respect the law.

 

Compliance isn’t optional. And the last thing you ever want to do is run afoul of Mexican law.

 

If none of that matters to you and nothing I’ve written has discouraged you, then come ahead! There’s a sandy beach, blue water, the friendliest folks and a lifestyle unlike anything imaginable waiting for you!  I’ll buy the first beer. See you down here!

That’s our story!

Jonathan signature

Jonathan

_______________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife and fishing buddy, Jilly, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com  or drop by the restaurant to say hi!

______________

Jonathan Roldan’s

Tailhunter International

 

TAILHUNTER FISHING FLEET #1 Rated on Trip Advisor

TAILHUNTER RESTAURANT BAR #1 Rated in La Paz on Trip Advisor

 

Now follow us on FACEBOOK TOO

 

Website: www.tailhunter-international.com

U.S. Office: 8030 La Mesa, Suite #178, La Mesa CA  91942

Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico

Phones:

from USA : 626-638-3383

from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:

http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Videos:

http://www.youtube.com/user/pangapirate

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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