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Posts Tagged ‘marilin’

Only two guys who've fished together for awhile like Captain Jorge and Steve would mug like this. Just two guys fishing together!

DIFFERENTLY THE SAME!

Originally Published the Week of March 8, 2012 in Western Outdoor News

I’m just saying.   I think the world might just be a better place if we all just did a little more fishing.  It might solve a few problems, or at least not have so many. 

 Nations and,  even neighbors,  are pulled-apart by such complicated issues as religion, culture, politics and language or such silly stuff as, “I hate the music that jerk plays! ” 

 

There are simply countless reasons NOT to like each other.  So many reasons to polarize us all. I’m as guilty as the next person.  I probably let a person’s differences jump out at me more often than they should.

 But put two knuckleheaded guys as dissimilar as night and day in a boat… keep some fishing rods handy… and give them the mutally-advantageous goal of trying to fool an animal with a brain the size of a pea…

And it’s amazing to watch what develops. I see it happen all the time. 

One guy speaks Spanish.  One English.

One knows how to run a fishing boat.  One knows how to run a million-dollar company.

One has 3 kids and lives in a cinderblock home with a tin roof and a chicken or two in the yard.  The other has 1 ex-wife, two mortgages and rents a roof-top condo on the west side.

One has spent 30 years learning the waters that provide his livelihood and survival.

One has two advanced university degrees.

One can fix a Mercury outboard or Chevy engine with duct tape and a butter knife.

One can do Power Point presentations before a Board of Directors.

One makes the best goat-meat barbecue in his neighborhood. 

One makes a mean happy hour martini. 

In any other context, there’s hardly a single reason for these two guys to care a wit about the other.  But, put them in a fishing boat…

And they get along just fine!

All the disparate petty things that pull drive us apart or keep us from getting to know each seem to take 2nd chair to the overall goal of putting a dumb fish in the boat!

Language barriers are overcome with the simple universal communication of a smile or a laugh. 

Often, both guys try extra hard to actually LISTEN more carefully and WATCH more closely.  They SPEAK more carefully and simply to each other…even in their own languages, because they really WANT to be understood! 

We have smart phones, Facebook, Twitter, Google and Skype…all the technology in the world, but we’ve forgotten the skills of LISTENING, WATCHING and SPEAKING SIMPLY! Two guys in a boat wanting to catch a fish will resort to animated and creative hand gestures to make themselves understood!

At the end of the day…smiles…and maybe a photo or two…and a handshake. Both understand “Gracias” and “Thank you.”

 

“Tomorrow” says one.

“Manana!” says the other.

By the next day, more grins on the beach as they meet to go out.  The captain pulls out a little foil packet of grilled fish burritos that his wife made for the client and wants to share. 

“Delicious! exclaims the client surprisedly. 

“Delcio-SO!” confirms the captain proudly with a grin. 

“Hey, Spanish and English are almost the same!” says the client through another mouthful of burrito.

“Si!…Yes!” replies the smiling Captain

“Good…uh…BIEN” laughs the client.

“Correc-TO!” confirms  the Captain as he revs the motor.

The client rummages through his bag and pulls out a box of juice to share with the captain. Gratefully accepted.  Smiles and nods.

And they head out for another day of fishing. 

…and the language barriers start to diminish.  And with each passing hour, the other barriers don’t matter.  They never really did.

At the end of the day, the client “thinks” he understands that the Captain has a younger son who likes baseball. Both have daughters about the same age.  The Captain now knows the client likes the N.Y. Yankees (Captain likes the Red Sox) and the client lives in San Diego.  They both think politicians in both countries are the same…idiots!  Laughs.

And so it goes.  At the end of the day, more handshakes and photos.  More smiles.  The client gives the captain some lures as a gift.  His eyes light-up gratefully!

Mil Gracias!…Mucho thank you’s” says the captain grasping the precious lures.

“Thank YOU very much” answers the client pointing at the captain  “…Gracias gracias, mi amigo!”

 And then the next year, the client comes back. 

 Hands clasp.  And there are big grins and smiles and anticipation of another great time on the water. 

The fisherman shows photos of his kids on his cell phone and photos from the last trip!  The captains smiles proudly looking at the photos.  Using hand gestures and simple words he demonstrates that his kids have grown “this much…”  He uses another hand gesture to happily say his wife has another baby coming! 

 

And every year it grows…3, 4, …7…10 years of fishing together. And it’s no longer captains and client.   A friendship grows. And not a hint of politics…or religion…or cultural differences. And they learn from each other.

He’s become a better fisherman and learned to love barbecued goat and fish jerky and how to catch his own bait.  

The captain has picked up quite a bit of English and has enjoyed bagels and cream cheese.  His son has a new baseball glove and a N.Y. Yankees ballcap.  The captain proudly uses a new reel from a place called “Cabelas.”

Oh…and over the years, they just happen to catch a few fish too.  But it never seemed to be as important or as fun as just two guys hanging out. 

Yup…the world might be a bit better if everyone just went fishing. We’re so differently the same.

 

That’s my story!

Jonathan

__________________________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife, Jill, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com  or drop by the restaurant to say hi!

 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

Website: www.tailhunter-international.com
U.S. Office: 3319 White Cloud Drive, Suite A, Hacienda Hts. CA 91745
Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.
Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:
http://www.tailhunter-international.com/fishreport.htm

Tailhunter YouTube Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/pangapirate


“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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A ittle planning before heading out is not a bad idea!

“WINTER MAX FISHING”

Originally Published in Western Outdoor Publications the Week of January 26, 2012

I might be committing a bit of heresy. Fishing can be crap in the winter.  OK, I said it. But, hold on. Before I’m ex-communicated from the fishing brotherhood, let me explain.

We’re doing all these fishing and hunting fishing shows and expos for the next three months.  Just finished Denver and, by the time you’re reading this, we’ll have just finished the ISE show in Sacramento and are on our way to the Seattle area for the next show.  These expos are great.  It’s an incredible opportunity to chat with old amigos and folks interested in coming to fish in Baja.

But, so often, I hear:

“We’ve fished down in Mexico 3 times and didn’t catch a thing.”

“Long boat ride. Just trolled all day.”

“Five trips and no marlin. No tuna.”

“They always lie and tell us there’s a lot of fish but we never get much.  Really disappointing.”

Then, I ask them, “What time of year did you go fishing?”

So often I hear, “Uh, December.” 

“Christmas”

“January”

“Winter time.”

I kinda shake my head.  I can certainly understand when I speak to these good folks who live in the frozen, wet, cold winters of Montana, Colorado, Alaska, Canada and Washington. There’s a definite need to toss off the down jackets and thermals and bolt as fast you can to the land of flip-flops and margarita!  If you’ve ever spent any time in these beautiful places, there’s only so much you can take until you crave some sunshine and Vitamin D.

But just cuz the sun is shining south of the border doesn’t necessarily mean the fish are biting.  At least not ALL the fish!

Sure, the brochures and websites all look good with all those pretty fish and sunny beaches, but so often, folks fail to check whether those gamefish species are biting during their vacation.  Just ask!  Or they fail to take a look at fish reports (like those in Western Outdoor News) or online reports. 

Although you really never know what you might hook when you fish in Baja, historically, most species run during particular seasons.  Just like anything else and everywhere else on earth, there’s a time for the whales to migrate; a time for the salmon run; for geese to fly south and yes…for marlin, dorado and tuna to show up as well! 

Very often tourists will book a boat and just tell the captain, “We want to catch a marlin” or “Let’s go for tuna!” 

The Mexican captain and crew, anxious to please, and understandably sometimes lacking the ability properly verbalize other alternatives,  fire up the engines and off  they go with a shrug and as much enthusiasm as they can muster.   If it’s a good day, the captain is a hero.  If it’s a bad day, he’s a goat. 

The better option would have been for the clients to ask what’s biting (no matter what time of year!) and pursuing those species or just letting the captain fish.

  Give the green light. Tell him you want some action.  (It’s an easy word in Spanish…”accion!”)

 Most captains I’ve known over the years that are worth their salt and lime don’t want to go on a long boat ride anymore than you. Pragmatically, why burn the gas for nothing?  Believe me, they want to catch fish as much as you do! When our own captains in our fleet hear the word “accion,”  I usually see big smiles and hear an enthusiastic, “Vamonos!” (Let’s go!”)

 Especially, for Mexican winter-time fishing, when there can be so many variables in wind, current, tides and fish,  find out what’s going on and do a little research before booking your trip. It will be worth your effort.  Maybe you’ll find out it’s better to go another time; change your fishing strategies or even go somewhere else! 

The Baja is 1000 miles long with about 2000 miles of coastline and bordering two different oceans.  What’s biting in Cabo isn’t the same as what’s biting in Mulege.  What they’re catching in Ensenada or off Cedros Island isn’t the same as the catches in Bahia de Los Angeles.  Common sense!

I often get prospective clients telling us, they are coming in the winter and “I want to catch a marlin.”  Or, “I’ve never caught a dorado.”

I’ve found it’s better to possibly lose the booking and be up front. Better to have a happy satisfied client than disappointing a client that had unrealistic expectations. 

So,   I tell them when the optimal time would be to catch the fish they are looking for or, if their vacations are already set, I make sure to give them realistic expectations for what they are most likely to encounter.

For instance in winter it might be cabrilla…pargo…snapper…sierra…jack crevalle…bonito…yellowtail…etc.  I also throw in the kind of weather and ocean conditions that might arise as well.  Of course, Baja being Baja and the fish gods often being fickle, if they do catch some trophy blue water fish, expectations have been exceeded. We’re suddenly heroes and my captain is the best thing since the invention of the tortilla.  

But, lacking that, I encourage folks to ask what’s biting and be flexible about the fishing as the best way to avoid disappointment. Nothing is ever guaranteed in fishing, but plan your fishing as carefully as you plan your hotel and the rest of your vacation and you’ll max your vacation memories.

_________________

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife, Jill, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com  or drop by the restaurant to say hi!

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

TAILHUNTER FISHING FLEET #1 Rated on Trip Advisor

TAILHUNTER RESTAURANT BAR #1 Rated in La Paz on Trip Advisor

 

Now follow us on FACEBOOK TOO

                       

 
Website: www.tailhunter-international.com
U.S. Office: 3319 White Cloud Drive, Suite A, Hacienda Hts. CA 91745
Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.
Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:
http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/pangapirate


“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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Look out! These gals can fish!

STAY HOME NO MORE!

Originally Published in Western Outdoor News the Week of December 14, 2011

          “Steve used to leave me at home, but if he knows what’s good for him, he better bring me along!” laughed one of the ladies.

 

          “I know what you mean,” said another gal at the beachside table. “My husband can still take a ‘man-cation’ with the buddies, but he knows he has to make time to take me on a separate trip also!”

 

          “I used to think it would be boring but after my first trip, I couldn’t wait to get back,” grinned another of the women.

 

          Back in the day,  fishing trips to “the Baja” or “Old Mexico”  used to be a manly-man affair.  Jim, Joe, Jack, Harry and the rest of the guys piled into a van with the sleeping bags and an old Coleman canvas tent for the dusty drive or  climbed into an airplane full of other guys doing the same thing and landing at some one-desk airport…if there was even an airport. 

 

          Ice chests, rods and fishing gear were all tied together.  A pair of shorts or two; some flip-flops for the feet; a straw fishing  hat; some t-shirts were all the clothes you needed stuffed into an old salt-stained gym bag. 

 

          If you couldn’t swim in it or rinse it out in the sink, you didn’t need it!  As long as the beer was cold and you could put sand between your toes, it was pretty simple.

 

          You camped anywhere.  Or you stuffed as many guys into an economical room near the beach.  Maybe it had running waiter.  Maybe not.  Maybe it had a toilet.  Maybe not. So what? 

 

          There was always a bar  somewhere and the drinks were frosty.  The fishing was always good.  There was always an old hammock somewhere.  The jokes were always funny.  You ate what they cooked or you ate what you caught.   There’s nothing you can’t eat wrapped in a tortilla. 

 

          If  it tasted good, you made it taste better with more salsa.  If it tasted bad, you added extra salsa and drank more beer.  Nothing that couldn’t be cured with more salsa or beer. What happened in Mexico stayed in Mexico. You and the guys!

 

          Oh how times have changed!

         

          These days, with more frequency, the complexion of Mexico fishing trips is changing.  If you ever watch folks de-plane at the airport or even watch the cruisers and pangas go out in the morning, you’ll notice a few things…

 

          A few more pieces of pink luggage on the tarmac…

 

          A few more “anglers” wearing sundresses and halter-tops…

 

          A few more high-pitched laughs in the mornings on the dock and beach…

 

          Jim and Joe and Harry have brought along Sarah, Joanie and Kathleen, and it’s happening more and more.

 

          And don’t be fooled by the dangly -earrings, manicured nails or floral sandals.  These ladies come to fish!  No longer content to just “ride along” or “just coming to watch,” these gals have no qualms about going hand-to-hand with the world-class fish in Mexican waters or shoulder-to-shoulder with their husbands, brothers, dads, and buddies!

 

          “I don’t need any help when I’m on a fish! If I’m hooked, up, everyone else better get outta my way!” is how one lady angler put it.

 

          “I can hang with the guys and I especially like being able to spend time doing something that used to be an all-guys sport,” is what another told me.  “I started fishing with my boyfriend who took the time to show me how to fish and now he’s my husband!” she beamed with a smile.

 

          It’s a great way for families or couples to have quality time together.

 

          The captain of one charter boat in Cabo San Lucas once told me, “I like having the ladies aboard.  They tend to listen better and you can coach them.  They are not afraid to ask questions.   They have more patience sometimes than the guys and beat the fish with technique rather than brute strength which is what some guys often do.  I’m never surprised when one of the women or girls outfishes the guys although it often surprises the guys!” 

 

          Some can handle it.  Some can’t!

 

          “Some guys get their shorts all bunched up if a woman does better than them,” said another captain.  “But, if you put all the macho-stuff aside, everyone has fun although some of the women are as fiercely competitive as the men and get as fired-up as the men when it comes to who-fishes-better-than who!  Some of the women can really talk smack!” he laughingly added.

 

          “I love to outfish my boyfriend,” grinned one young lady who talked about her fishing trip as she watched the crew fillet their catch of dorado.  “It seems whenever we come to Mexico, I catch the biggest fish or the most fish,” she said proudly.

 

          “I let her win!” retorted the boyfriend with a wink and a laugh who got a playful elbow in the ribs as he raised a bottle of beer in a toast.

 

          In some ways, it’s a two-edged sword.  For many guys who used to do the all-boys trip, the days are long gone or numbered.  On the other hand, getting a wife, girlfriend or daughter interested in fishing with you is a pretty nice trade-off.

 

That’s our story…

Jonathan

______________________________________________________________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife, Jill, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com  or drop by the restaurant to say hi!           

 

 

 

Jonathan Roldan’s Tailhunter International

 

TAILHUNTER FISHING FLEET #1 Rated on Trip Advisor

TAILHUNTER RESTAURANT BAR #1 Rated in La Paz on Trip Advisor

 

Now follow us on FACEBOOK TOO

 

Website: www.tailhunter-international.com U.S. Office: 3319 White Cloud Drive, Suite A, Hacienda Hts. CA 91745 Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico Phones: from USA : 626-638-3383 from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.

Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report: http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/pangapirate

“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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“FALL NEVER FAILS”

Originally Published in Western Outdoor News the Week of Oct. 5, 2011

Long before I ever lived down here in Mexico.   Long before I even had an idea that I might someday be living down here in Baja, let alone running a business, I was like alot of you.

 

I worked some semblance of a 9-5 job.  I had a day or two off a week.  I had vacation time and 3 and 4 day weekends like everyone else 

 

And, I planned my fishing trips like everyone less.

 

Early in the year, I would pull out my big fishing “master calendar” and figure all the places that I’d like to fish during the season. Trying to budget my time and wallet. And moon phases…

 

Big red marker…

 

Let’s see…shallow water rock fishing on the central coast…late winter or early spring. Check.

 

Trout opener in the Sierras…April. OK

 

Maybe sneak away for flyfishing in Montana…hmmm…June.  Check.

 

San Diego  kelp paddy yellowtail…late June.  Can’t miss that.

 

July for king salmon and halibut in Alaska. Better check airfare now.

 

August…hmmmm…albacore and bluefin should be running.  Book San Diego again.  Check.

 

September…hehehehe…long range?  10 days?  I’ll try to get a kitchen pass!

October/November…BAJA!

 

The fall in Baja has always been good to me.  Pragmatically, it’s a good time to come down.  It’s not as hot generally.  Shadows are a bit longer.  Air is a tad cooler.  Waters are still warm.  Generally flat with small breezes. The killer humidity is lower.

 

Most of the summer yahoo crowd is gone.  Kids are back in school.  It’s not quite the holidays so alot of places are only populated by fishermen walking around.  During the days when the fleets are out, the towns are empty!

 

Many airlines consider the dip between Labor Day and Thanksgiving a “downtime” as well so they offer low-season rates on flights. And, as long as you’re not trying to book a boat during a big-time tournament, the best boats and captains are always available and ready to roll.

 

From a fishing perspective, the season has never failed me. 

 

I’ve caught the majority of my billfish during the fall. In fact, I got my  largest, a 400-pounder in October.

 

My largest and biggest wahoo have all been caught in the fall.

 

The majority of my tuna and my largest, a 236-pound cow was caught in the fall.

 

Come to think of it, my largest dorado have all been caught in the fall as well.

 

I guess there’s a reason so many of the biggest and most popular fishing tournaments in Baja,  and indeed Mexico,  are held in the fall.  That’s when the big fish are around.  That’s when many of  the  top-water pelagic trophy-fish that made Baja famous can be found…blue marlin…black marlin…sailfish…yellowfin tuna…wahoo…dorado…and others.

 

Had you the luxury, you could literally hop from one tournament to the other.  One stops.  Another begins.  I know some semi-professional tournament teams and that’s what they literally do.  They  zoom from one tournament to the other.  You could probably just stay in Cabo San Lucas and between September and November participate in a virtual assembly line of tournaments and never leave the city except to go fishing.

 

In many circles, Southern California comes to mind, once Labor day has gone, so do the fishermen.  Well, the fish don’t simply stop biting because the calendar says summer is over.  At least as far as Baja is concerned, the end of summer marks the beginning of some of the best fishing around!

That’s my story

Jonathan

 

____________________________________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife, Jill, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com  or drop by the restaurant to say hi!    

 

____________________________________

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

TAILHUNTER FISHING FLEET #1 Rated on Trip Advisor

TAILHUNTER RESTAURANT BAR #1 Rated in La Paz on Trip Advisor

 

Now follow us on FACEBOOK TOO

 
Website: www.tailhunter-international.com
U.S. Office: 3319 White Cloud Drive, Suite A, Hacienda Hts. CA 91745
Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

.
Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:
http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/pangapirate


“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

 

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When it comes to bait or any fishing techniques, if it results in a bent rod, it's hard to dismiss it! Try it. You never know!

IF IT WORKS DON’T LAUGH!

Originally Published the Week of Sept. 6, 2o11 in Western Outdoor News

I am often amazed at what catches fish down here.  Of course, us gringos are always looking for “live bait” like caballitos, mackerel, sardines and the like.  Plus we have all the “latest and greatest” technology has to offer in the way of lures, plugs and feathers. 

 

But, over the years, having worked with so many captains in so many areas of Baja, I’ve come across some pretty incredible things that have been used for bait…and they work!

 

BELLIES & STRIPS – Long ago when I lived in Los Frailes, the owner of the hotel turned me onto taking the oily juicy strips of belly meat from dorado and bonito and  pinning them on the hooks of my feathers and jigs, especially my marlin lures.  Strips of squid also work.  They add scent and flavor to your lures.  I also think gamefish tend to hold onto them more when there’s some “taste” to the lure.

 

Actually, even without the feather or jig, one of the most effective methods of attracting game fish is to simply pin a nice long strip of these species to a hook and leader (make sure you have a swivel) and drag it slowly behind your boat.  Bigger fish can’t seem to resist it.  Even large dorado will jump on dorado strips!

 

If you happen to get into a bite of the giant squid, give some thought to taking the whole head and sending it down deep.  I’ve gotten some monster tuna on 5-pound chunks of head.  Smaller giant squid worked when trolled and long-rangers will tell you that a big squid bounced on the waves from a kite are deadly.

 

It’s also  productive to chop the  squid legs (arms?) into chunks and just tossing handfuls into the ocean as chum then taking another big chunk and hook it, letting it all drift down to the game fish.  Often, even when the fish won’t take live bait, they WILL eat the chummed bait.

 

WHOLE FISH –  As much as we tend to hate needlefish down here as the scourge of fishermen, a smaller needlefish slow-trolled in the rocky areas will sometimes really get nailed by a big pargo, snapper or cabrilla. 

 

Sent down deep, this can be deadly for a big grouper around the islands…or even using a small bonito!  Cut off a fin and score a few knife cuts into the flesh to get it bleeding then send it down with a heavy weight and see what happens!  If it’s live, you better hold into your socks!

 

One of the strangest baits I have ever used was small puffer fish.  I often noticed that when we cleaned dorado we would find whole puffer fish in the stomachs of bull dorado.  (Maybe I can see eating one, but the thought of passing one of the spikey guys out the backside raises some eyebrows).

 

Anyway, I asked one of my captains and he said he often saw dorado eat floating puffer fish and that the smaller ones make good bait.  So we caught some floaters and put them in the bait tank.  When we got into a dorado bite we tossed some into the fray…like surface poppers and sure enough…WHAM! WHAM! WHAM!  Puffers were hit faster than sardines!  It worked!  Small barracuda work also or larger ballyhood.

 

INORGANIC BAITS

 

OK…here’s some of the crazier stuff I have seen work…

 

1.  Strips of tortilla cut like a “pig-and-jig” fork-tail and thrown into feeding dorado and bonito.

 

2.  Strips of white rubber liner like the kind you put on the bottom of your kitchen sink so that your dishes have a cushion.  Slow trolled or cut like the back end of a small bait fish…twitched along the reefs, you’d be surprised what comes out to chase it!  It’s a cheap swim bait!

 

3.  A mop head!  Old Mexican fishermen will tell you that they used to troll old mop heads without a hook.  The abrasive bill of sailfish and marlin are like a rasp.  They would hit the trolled mop head and it would wrap around their bills like velcro!  Hook up!  I’ve seen it used one time and it blew me away!

 

4.  Orange Crush bottle – I once saw commercial fishermen leave some orange soda in a bottle; put crushed tinfoil in it and re-cap it.  They tied it behind a panga and trolled it in the wake like a teaser!  I saw it raise several sailfish like this!

 

If it works, don’t laugh!

 

__________________________

 

Jonathan Roldan has been writing the Baja Column in Western Outdoor News since 2004.  Along with his wife, Jill, they own and run the Tailhunter International Fishing Fleet in La Paz, Baja, Mexico  www.tailhunter-international.com.  They also run their Tailhunter Restaurant Bar on the famous La Paz malecon waterfront.  If you’d like to contact him directly, his e-mail is riplipboy@tailhunter-international.com  or drop by the restaurant to say hi!           

 

_________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jonathan Roldan’s
Tailhunter International

 

TAILHUNTER FISHING FLEET #1 Rated on Trip Advisor

TAILHUNTER RESTAURANT BAR #1 Rated in La Paz on Trip Advisor

 

Now follow us on FACEBOOK TOO

 
Website: www.tailhunter-international.com
U.S. Office: 3319 White Cloud Drive, Suite A, Hacienda Hts. CA 91745
Mexico Office: 755 Paseo Obregon, La Paz, Baja Sur, Mexico
Phones:
from USA : 626-638-3383
from Mexico: 044-612-14-17863

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Tailhunter Weekly Fishing Report:
http://fishreport.jonathanroldan.com/

Tailhunter YouTube Videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/pangapirate


“When your life finally flashes before your eyes, you will have only moments to regret all the things in life you never had the courage to try.”

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